Let’s talk about sex: New book sheds light on French sexual mores

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France has a certain reputation when it comes to sex. Yet believe it or not, the French have become even less inhibited in recent years.A new book entitled “Love and Sexual Behaviour in France” (La Vie Sexuelle en France) by Janine Mossuz-Lavau, an emeritus research director with the National Centre for Scientific Research, illustrates how attitudes have shifted in France by interviewing 65 men and women of various ages, socioeconomic backgrounds and sexual tendencies from across the country.It is a follow-up to Mossuz-Lavau’s first book on the subject, which was based on a similar study back in 2000.“I wanted to see how things had evolved in the last 17 years,” she told FRANCE 24.

Already reputed to be one of the most sexually liberated countries in the world, Mossuz-Lavau found that behaviour in France is now less inhibited than it was nearly two decades ago.

“Sexual behaviour has changed. I can’t be 100 percent certain, because even if I’ve spent hours talking with my subjects, I’m not in their bedrooms. But yes, it would appear they are more liberated in their behaviour,” she said.

Mossuz-Lavau said acts that were previously frowned upon in France, such as fellatio, have been largely normalised. She attributed this to the fact that people are more comfortable discussing the subject than they were before.

“There’s also a big shift in how people talk about [sex]French people are much more open to discussing [it]. Seventeen years ago, I had to ask specific questions. But now people bring things up freely,” she said.

For Mossuz-Lavau – who conducted her study between January and November 2017 – this newfound freedom of expression is, in part, linked to the global #MeToo movement, which sparked widespread debate over sexual behaviour by encouraging victims of abuse to speak out.

Already reputed to be one of the most sexually liberated countries in the world, Mossuz-Lavau found that behaviour in France is now less inhibited than it was nearly two decades ago.

“Sexual behaviour has changed. I can’t be 100 percent certain, because even if I’ve spent hours talking with my subjects, I’m not in their bedrooms. But yes, it would appear they are more liberated in their behaviour,” she said.

Mossuz-Lavau said acts that were previously frowned upon in France, such as fellatio, have been largely normalised. She attributed this to the fact that people are more comfortable discussing the subject than they were before.

“There’s also a big shift in how people talk about [sex]French people are much more open to discussing [it]. Seventeen years ago, I had to ask specific questions. But now people bring things up freely,” she said.

For Mossuz-Lavau – who conducted her study between January and November 2017 – this newfound freedom of expression is, in part, linked to the global #MeToo movement, which sparked widespread debate over sexual behaviour by encouraging victims of abuse to speak out.

No sex: The ‘last taboo’

Yet if there’s one thing people still aren’t comfortable talking about, it’s the absence of sex in a relationship.

“It’s what I call the ‘last taboo’ in my book: couples who have been together for a long time, who may even spend their lives together – young and old – who stop having sex. It’s very common, but we never hear anything about it,” said Mossuz-Lavau.

In writing “Love and Sexual Behaviour in France”, Mossuz-Lavau sought to make her book as human as possible, forgoing scientific references for cultural ones drawn from popular literature, music and film.

She sets the tone in the introduction by quoting French philosopher Ruwen Ogien: “I am not offering an original definition of love. I leave the creative reader to find one that can satisfy everyone. But … it would be a bad idea to try.”

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Continue at FRANCE 24: Let’s talk about sex: New book sheds light on French sexual mores – France 24

France Takes On Cellphone Addiction With a Ban in Schools 

A French law is set to bar cellphone use by primary and middle school students, an effort to cut down on distractions in class and encourage play or reading during recess.

PARIS—Solal Paroux’s friends all have smartphones, and the 12-year-old Parisian has been needling his parents to get him one too. But his parents are resisting.

And now they have the law on their side.

When school starts up in September, a new French law will ban students ranging roughly from ages 3 to 15 from using smartphones anywhere on school grounds, with only narrow exceptions.

The law is one of the most sweeping attempts yet to address growing concerns among parents and educators that a generation of children is growing up addicted to the mobile devices in their pockets.

“Children don’t have the maturity” for smartphones, said Valérie Paroux, Solal’s mother. “Some adults don’t either.”

France’s education minister, Jean-Michel Blanquer, says the ban, which applies to the French equivalent of preschool through ninth grade, is intended to remove distractions during class and to encourage children to read a book or play outside during recreation. He says he hopes the law will serve as a symbolic message to both children and adults beyond school.

“We’re not seeking to reject technological progress—that would be absurd—but rather to master it, to make sure man is the master of the machine,” said Mr. Blanquer, who himself has two smartphones. “It all begins with education.”

In recent months, complaints that big tech firms’ products are too addictive, particularlyfor children, have started to resonate in Silicon Valley. Facebook Inc. earlier this month said it would start offering tools to show users how long they use its service and alert them to take a break.

Apple Inc. AAPL 0.23%and Alphabet Inc.’s GOOGL -2.06%Google each also plans to introduce similar tools into new operating systems for iPhones and Android phones. Apple’s “Screen Time” system will enable parents remotely to monitor the apps their children use and limit their time on devices. Continue reading “France Takes On Cellphone Addiction With a Ban in Schools “

Worst of heatwave yet to come as France braces for ‘terrible’ Tuesday

France’s heatwave is set to continue, with the hottest weather yet expected on Monday and Tuesday across the country.On Monday, temperatures could soar up to around 40C according to France’s national weather agency Météo France. France’s met office has issued heatwave weather warnings for 67 departments out of 101 in France – a record first reached in June last year – and has warned against storms in the country’s southeast in the afternoon, Le Parisien reported.

“The heatwave continues tomorrow Monday, with very high temperatures which will be difficult to bear. Be careful of storms on the southeast in the afternoon with a risk of hail,” the weather forecaster wrote on Twitter.

On Monday, the hottest parts of France will be in the southwestern regions, with temperatures in some cities reaching 36C in Toulouse and 37C in Bordeaux.

On Tuesday, Paris and the country’s northeast and centre will be the most affected by the heat, with Lyon and Paris sweltering under 36C.

Meteorologist Guillaume Séchet, creator of the site meteo-paris.com, is referring to Tuesday as a “terrible day with 38-39C in Ile-de-France and highs of 40C around Bourges and Auxerre”.

There will be a gradual decline in temperatures in the south-east of France on Tuesday but it will remain very hot.

Fortunately, the mercury is expected to drop considerably by Wednesday and Thursday.

“All of a sudden, we will lose 10C in 24 hours in the North and return to a more normal 23 to 24 C in the second half of the week,” Guillaume Séchet told Le Parisien.

France’s scorching weather is also causing air pollution levels to soar.

On Monday, traffic is being reduced in both Lyon and Paris to cut down on the smog with cars belonging to the most polluting category of vehicles being banned.

Similar measures were taken for three days in Paris in July.

Speed limits have also been lowered throughout the Ile de France region around Paris and in the east of the country.

Like much of Europe, France has been hit by a heatwave over the past week – which is already turning into the third hottest since temperatures have been recorded.

Last week, four nuclear reactors were forced to close in order to avoid raising the temperature of rivers whose water is used to cool reactors and then returned.

On Saturday, the southern town of Béziers in the Hérault department reached 41.3C. It was the hottest day in France since a deadly heatwave in 2003, that killed thousands of elderly people.

Source: Worst of heatwave yet to come as France braces for ‘terrible’ Tuesday – The Local

Vindigo Blue Wine Is Taking France By Storm & You’re About To See A Lot More Of It

Did you think that uniquely-colored wine was just a brief and momentary fad? Think again — because Vindigo, a new blue wine, has arrived, and it’s making waves that are just as big as they were the last time we saw such a colorful boozy creation hit the internet. Created by a Frenchman and produced in Spain, Vindigo has a sweet, fruity taste and a delicate hue that’s closer to turquoise than to royal blue — so naturally, everyone is obsessed with it. I mean, how could we not be? It’s just so pretty [ . . . ]

Continue at BUNGLE: Vindigo Blue Wine Is Taking France By Storm & You’re About To See A Lot More Of It