Comme une Française: Need-to-know vocabulary for your next visit to Paris

Joyeux Noël! It’s easy enough to discover the translation of “Merry Christmas” in French, but as an It’s no secret that travel (and total immersion) is one of the best ways to learn a language. You may not be able to physically travel to Paris right now, but we can go on a virtual tour of the city together! In today’s lesson, I’ll walk you through the different “arrondissements” of Paris, pointing out common landmarks and explaining why the city is arranged in this way. Repeat after me as I slowly pronounce some new vocabulary words. Then, let me know in the comments: did you learn anything new?

Géraldine

Site helps owners plan dog-friendly trips in France

As French residents are encouraged to take holidays in France this summer post-Covid-19, a website is helping dog-owners plan holidays with their pets, sharing dog-friendly listings around the country.

Emmène ton chien (Bring Your Dog), launched by Sophie Morche, has around 100,000 monthly visitors – known as “Wouafers” – who search the site find to dog-friendly places to visit in France, as approved by other members.

Ms Morche says visitors can share places that have made their dogs “really welcome” in France. Dog-friendly establishments are then given a rating from 1-4 on the website’s “Qualidog” scale, depending on how positive users’ experiences have been.

Information provided on the site includes how many dogs can be allowed into a dog-friendly establishment at once, what size dogs are welcome, and whether services – such as bowls and dog pads – are provided. It also answers questions such as which campsites allow dogs in onsite restaurants, and which holiday cottages have dog-gardens. 

Five years ago, Ms Morche adopted her own dog and quickly found: “Finding dog-friendly places wasn’t simple. Often you don’t know what the welcome will be like when you go somewhere. My dog is a member, and a full part, of my family. There are about 18 million people in the same situation [in France], and we shouldn’t apologise for wanting to go on holiday with the whole family!”

As well as accommodation and restaurants, emmenetonchien.com includes popular destinations in France, such as tourist sites and physical activity centres. It also has listings for activities specifically for dogs, such as agility courses and even dog massages. 

For places that want to improve their “Qualidog” rating, the site also offers advice on how to better welcome dog owners. 

Source: Site helps owners plan dog-friendly trips in France

Discovering Paris’s Canal Saint-Martin

Inaugurated in 1825, the Canal Saint-Martin stretches over five districts of eastern Paris. Once essential for transporting goods, it’s mainly used today by tour boats and pleasure cruises. Along its four kilometres, the canal with its nine locks lets both Parisians and tourists alike discover the French capital from a different perspective. FRANCE 24 went on board.

Source: Discovering Paris’s Canal Saint-Martin – You are here

The Best Airbnbs in the South of France

Including Julia Child’s very own cottage (with plenty of kitchen utensils included).

We’ve said it again and again: there’s so much more to France than just a trip to Paris. Case in point? The South of France—a.k.a. the Provence-Alpes-Côte d’Azur region—is home to some of our favorite towns. There are big names like Cannes, Marseilles, and Nice in the area, but there are plenty of smaller towns to enjoy, like Menton, Grasse, and Cassis. If you want to live out your provincial French fantasy—whether it’s smack on the beach, in a historic old town apartment, a multi-acre château, or in Julia Child’s own kitchen—we’ve got some Airbnbs for you to book, spread all across the region.

As a bonus, all of the Airbnb selections are run by Superhosts, who each have a rating of 4.8 or above, a record of zero cancellations, and at least a 90 percent response rate, meaning they’ll get back to you ASAP. Read on to find the perfect Airbnb for your vacation along France’s southern coast [ . . . ]

Continue at: The Best Airbnbs in the South of France – Condé Nast Traveler

6 French Honeymoon Ideas You Should Consider Instead of Paris 

France has so much more to offer.

There are few things not to love about Paris. From the history, to the architecture, to the language and the food, it’s always at the top of honeymooners’ wish lists. But Paris is hardly the only honeymoon spot in France, and if you’re the kind of couple who like to do things a bit differently, we encourage you to set your sights beyond the City of Lights. Getting outside the big city will illuminate all sorts of charming aspects of French culture, from the joys of a cozy aprés-ski in the mountains, to eating fresh oysters in the seaside villages of Brittany. So when it comes to planning your honeymoon in France, there are plenty of places to love—and be in love.

French Alps

Dramatic landscapes, outdoor adventure, charming villages—if these sound appealing to you, perhaps you should consider a trip to the French Alps. Flying in and out of Geneva is probably the easiest way to get there from the States, and from there you are in prime position to explore Mont Blanc, Chamonix, Verbier, and Megève. The L’Hermitage Paccard is a decadent experience with unparalleled views of the Alps, and the W Verbier has a bit more of a scene going on in case you want to have more options by way of restaurants and nightlife. The Cheval Blanc in Courchevel is the region’s grande dame of hotels, and the fifty-five room Four Seasons Megève has all the walnut-paneled walls and fireplaces you’d expect from a luxury property in this neck of the woods. Obviously winter sports are the region’s main draw (“apré-ski” is a French term, after all), but these little towns also have a dedicated community of hikers and mountaineers in the warmer months. Wherever you end up staying, your concierge will be able to arrange all sorts of beautiful hikes and such so you can make the most of your stay [ . . . ]

Continue reading at BRIDES: 6 French Honeymoon Ideas You Should Consider Instead of Paris | Brides



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