Coronavirus: Why so many people are dying in Belgium

Belgium believes its high Covid-19 mortality rate is down to more rigorous counting of cases.

That rate, unlike the total number of fatalities, is a measure of the number of deaths in relation to the size of population.

President Donald Trump pointed to a graph recently, displaying Belgium at the top and the US in seventh place, as a result of the number of deaths relative to population size.

President Donald Trump listens beside a chart showing daily mortality cases during the daily coronavirus task force briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S., April 18, 2020

He was suggesting the US was handling the pandemic more effectively.

Belgium has a population of 11.5 million. That means 66 people in every 100,000 have died from Covid-19. In the US, with a population of around 330 million, it’s 19 in every 100,000, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

But those figures are “faulty comparisons” that have been “abused”, argues Prof Steven Van Gucht, a Belgian virologist and government spokesman.

“That’s the difference between public health science and political motivation,” he explains. “That’s purely inspired by showing how good you are doing, and it’s wrong. We are actually reporting in a more correct way.”

What’s different about Belgium?

Belgian officials say they are counting in a way that no other country in the world is currently doing: counting deaths in hospitals and care homes, but including deaths in care homes that are suspected, not confirmed, as Covid-19 cases. Continue reading “Coronavirus: Why so many people are dying in Belgium”

Angèle: The Belgian Singer That France Is Going Crazy For 

Her album has gone two-times platinum in France, she’s the only Belgian singer to beat Stromae’s record for most weeks at the top of the Belgian singles chart, and she’s only just getting started in her career. Angèle is a singer-songwriter and musician spinning heads all across Francophone nations with her unique voice. Her songs have become millennial-girl anthems because of her sincerity, sweet disposition, and entertaining videos.

At just 23 years old, the singer has already developed a very recognizable style. Her music is easy listening, her videos are funny, and the genuine nature and authenticity play a huge role in her popularity. For example, the cover of her first album Brol is a little girl smiling to show that her baby teeth have fallen out. For this kind of bluntness and plenty of Instagram videos of poking fun at herself, Angèle has become the singer du jour.

Like a modern-day Françoise Hardy, Angèle depicts a certain innocent reality in her songs. “Tout Oublier,” featuring her rap-artist brother Roméo Elvis, broke a whole slew of records on Belgian singles charts, winning the artist awards and recognition. With an existential vibe the song features a questioning of the simplicity or complication of happiness — a message resonates with Angèle’s audience (and most millennials these days).

Source: Angèle: The Belgian Singer That France Is Going Crazy For – Frenchly

The Dardenne Brothers – Masters of Social Realism

2014

Rear Window. 2014.
Filmmaking brothers Jean Pierre and Luc Dardenne are known on the world film circuit for their social realist dramas, set in the former industrial city of Liege in Belgium. Film critic Emilie Bickerton talks us through their early career and their later obsession with the plight of working class people in their home city. teleSUR

Noa Moon and Alex Germys in the village Francofou

Noa Moon, Alex Germys, Peter Peter, Tim Dup and Berywam are added to the list of artists expected at the Francofolies de Spa this summer. All will perform on a stage Francofou village.After the success of his album Paradise , Noa Moon returns with a new album in the spring of which one of the songs, Sparks , already circulates on the airwaves. Alex Germys , a young producer and 22-year-old Belgian DJ, returns to Les Francos to close the festival after having been on stage last year [ . . . ]

Full Story: Noa Moon and Alex Germys in the village Francofou – All the news 24/24 on Lavenir.net

Is This Man the Dr. Frankenstein of Beer? 

In a Belgium lab, one scientist is tweaking a more efficient, super-powered yeast — but brewers are turning their backs

Through the winding hallways of the centuries-old University of Leuven in Flanders, Belgium, past the sterile black counters in biological laboratories, buried in the depths of freezers, and suspended in cryogenic slumber, there sleeps a creature feared by the masses.

It’s small — microscopic, in fact — but it packs a punch. The creature is barred from entering certain laboratories in the United States to safeguard against contamination. It’s feared by the general public as an abomination of nature, an organism whose critics say it was created by the hands of man playing god. The creature is the target of lobbyists and NGOs that would like nothing more than for it to be destroyed. But, is this creature — actually a manmade strain of yeast, a single-celled organism humans have been cultivating for at least 7,000 years — just misunderstood?

Read the Full Story at: Is This Man the Dr. Frankenstein of Beer? – Eater