What Really Happens as Wine Ages?

Most wines sold in the U.S. are made for immediate consumption without the need for cellaring. Some wine lovers, however, prefer to “lay wine down,”—or store bottles for a few years in order to enjoy them when the flavors have evolved.So what happens as wine ages, and how do its flavors change? Which wines should be aged? And, most importantly, why do we age wines at all? Here’s what you need to know.

What happens to wine’s flavor as it ages?

When wines are young, we taste their primary flavors, like grassiness in Sauvignon Blanc, plum in Merlot, apricot in Viognier or citrus in Riesling. We may also notice some secondary notes associated with winemaking techniques, like the vanilla flavor of oak or buttery nuances from malolactic fermentation.When wines age, we start speaking about tertiary notes, or flavors that come from development. This could mean young, bold notions of fresh fruit that become gradually more subdued and reminiscent of dried fruit. Other flavors, previously hidden by bold primary notes, come to the fore, like honey, herbal notes, hay, mushroom, stone and earth.

What causes these changes?

in wine is ever static. Acids and alcohols react to form new compounds. Other compounds can dissolve, only to combine again in another fashion. These processes happen constantly and at different rates. Every time you open a bottle, you catch the wine at another stage in its development, with new and different nuances. While the proportion of alcohol, acids and sugars stay the same, the flavors continue to change.

Red wine colors from young to old: Ruby, brick, tanned leather. White wine colors from young to old: Lemon/pale green, gold, amber

How texture develops in wine

Texturally, the wines also change. Dry, aged white wines can become almost viscous and oily, while reds tend to feel smoother. This is due to phenolic compounds like tannins falling out as sediment over time [ . . . ]

Continue at WINE ENTHUSIAST: What Really Happens as Wine Ages? | Wine Enthusiast Magazine

Enjoy Restaurant Week in France during Tous Au Restaurant this October 

Restaurant Week

Restaurant Week à la française! From October 1st to 14th, more than 1,500 restaurants will participate in a restaurant week of sorts in Paris and other French cities, called Tous au Restaurant (everyone to the restaurant). The reservations open September 25th at 10:00 a.m. Paris time (4:00 a.m. EST), and can only be made on the Tous au Restaurant site, run by La Fourchette. [ . . . ]

Continue Reading at: Enjoy Restaurant Week in France during Tous Au Restaurant this October – Frenchly