How to order French wine, according to a sommelier 

Wine tips

A wine from Burgundy, Bordeaux, or the Loire Valley is a great place to start.

Nathan Derri is the sommelier at the newly opened 1855 Bar à Vins in the Back Bay, so he has a very strong handle on French wines. If you don’t, don’t sweat it, he said.

That said, if you feel like you need a little help ordering a bottle of French wine, Derri offered the following tips.

Get to know French wine labels

1855 Bar à Vins has more than 350 bottles of French wine on the menu — that’s a lot of vins! But once you understand French wine labels, it becomes easier to find the type of wine you enjoy, Derri said.

“I can see how French wine can be intimidating, but it’s not,” Derri said. “You just need to pop that cork, sit down, Continue reading “How to order French wine, according to a sommelier “

1 in 5 cheeses in Germany positive for Brucella; 9 vendors sold more than half of contaminated samples 

brucellosis

One in five cheeses sampled in Germany were found to be positive for Brucella, according to a study.

Brucella was detected in 41 of 200 samples from endemic countries sold at weekly markets, in supermarkets, and by delis in Berlin, as well as 15 prepacked cheese samples bought online via eBay.

Cheese made from pasteurized sheep’s milk and sold unlabeled or loose by market vendors was the most frequent type associated with the presence of Brucella DNA. Cheese samples included loose, non-labelled and pre-packed; labelled samples of brine, cream, soft, semi-hard and hard cheeses; and cheese made from bovine, ovine and caprine milk.

Researchers determined nine vendors sold more than 50 percent of the Brucella positive cheese samples, including seven at weekly markets and two supermarkets.[ . . . ]

Read Full Story at 1 in 5 cheeses in Germany positive for Brucella; 9 vendors sold more than half of contaminated samples | Food Safety News

Beyond glyphosate: French vineyards shift away from controversial weedkiller

France’s wine industry can become “the first in the world without glyphosate”, President Emmanuel Macron said Saturday at the Paris Agriculture Fair. But is foregoing the controversial herbicide possible? FRANCE 24 spoke with vintners.

At France’s largest, if temporary, farm – the country’s annual agricultural fair, held at Porte de Versailles exhibition grounds on the southern rim of Paris – it was barely 10am on Monday and Xavier Martin was already enjoying a glass of red wine.

At a stand showcasing his wine from Irouléguy in the Basque country, the 58-year-old had just polished off a fried egg and a slice of grilled bacon. “Wine, I was born in it,” the fifth-generation winegrower says. A salon jury had just rewarded his 2017 Mignaberry rosé with a gold medal.

Martin, who gave up on synthetic herbicides 20 years ago, feels strongly about glyphosate. “We must keep our soils clean, just as we received them from our ancestors, to pass them on to our children,” the bearded vintner says.

“These grounds will outlive us. We must work to preserve them.” Continue reading “Beyond glyphosate: French vineyards shift away from controversial weedkiller”