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Actress Adele Haenel accuses Manager of sexual harassment as #metoo Strikes French cinema

French actress Adele Haenel has accused a manager of raping her when she was a teen working on her very first feature film. Haenel, today 30, maintained in a meeting with French press outlet Mediap…

French actress Adele Haenel has accused a manager of raping her when she was a teen working on her very first feature film.

Haenel, today 30, maintained in a meeting with French press outlet Mediapart on Monday she had become the goal of”permanent sexual harassment” from director Christophe Ruggia if both worked with her debut film, The Devils, once she was 12 to 15.

She stated he forcefully kissed her neck and could touch her on the thighs and chest.

The celebrity, who has won two César awards — the French equivalent of the Oscars — included that she wouldn’t make an official complaint to the authorities but that she’d determined to come forward if she’d learned that Ruggia was likely a new film with teens.

She enticed the French judiciary method of not being intense enough on sexual abusers.

The French Society of Directors has provided its service to the celebrity and voiced its”respect and fame” at a statement issued on Monday. Additionally, it has expelled Ruggia.

Asked about the event on Wednesday, the French Minister for Justice Nicole Belloubet, stated that Haenel was incorrect to discredit the machine and encouraged her to submit a complaint.

Source: Actress Adele Haenel accuses Manager of sexual harassment as #metoo Strikes French cinema |

Let’s talk about sex: New book sheds light on French sexual mores

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France has a certain reputation when it comes to sex. Yet believe it or not, the French have become even less inhibited in recent years.A new book entitled “Love and Sexual Behaviour in France” (La Vie Sexuelle en France) by Janine Mossuz-Lavau, an emeritus research director with the National Centre for Scientific Research, illustrates how attitudes have shifted in France by interviewing 65 men and women of various ages, socioeconomic backgrounds and sexual tendencies from across the country.It is a follow-up to Mossuz-Lavau’s first book on the subject, which was based on a similar study back in 2000.“I wanted to see how things had evolved in the last 17 years,” she told FRANCE 24.

Already reputed to be one of the most sexually liberated countries in the world, Mossuz-Lavau found that behaviour in France is now less inhibited than it was nearly two decades ago.

“Sexual behaviour has changed. I can’t be 100 percent certain, because even if I’ve spent hours talking with my subjects, I’m not in their bedrooms. But yes, it would appear they are more liberated in their behaviour,” she said.

Mossuz-Lavau said acts that were previously frowned upon in France, such as fellatio, have been largely normalised. She attributed this to the fact that people are more comfortable discussing the subject than they were before.

“There’s also a big shift in how people talk about [sex]French people are much more open to discussing [it]. Seventeen years ago, I had to ask specific questions. But now people bring things up freely,” she said.

For Mossuz-Lavau – who conducted her study between January and November 2017 – this newfound freedom of expression is, in part, linked to the global #MeToo movement, which sparked widespread debate over sexual behaviour by encouraging victims of abuse to speak out.

Already reputed to be one of the most sexually liberated countries in the world, Mossuz-Lavau found that behaviour in France is now less inhibited than it was nearly two decades ago.

“Sexual behaviour has changed. I can’t be 100 percent certain, because even if I’ve spent hours talking with my subjects, I’m not in their bedrooms. But yes, it would appear they are more liberated in their behaviour,” she said.

Mossuz-Lavau said acts that were previously frowned upon in France, such as fellatio, have been largely normalised. She attributed this to the fact that people are more comfortable discussing the subject than they were before.

“There’s also a big shift in how people talk about [sex]French people are much more open to discussing [it]. Seventeen years ago, I had to ask specific questions. But now people bring things up freely,” she said.

For Mossuz-Lavau – who conducted her study between January and November 2017 – this newfound freedom of expression is, in part, linked to the global #MeToo movement, which sparked widespread debate over sexual behaviour by encouraging victims of abuse to speak out.

No sex: The ‘last taboo’

Yet if there’s one thing people still aren’t comfortable talking about, it’s the absence of sex in a relationship.

“It’s what I call the ‘last taboo’ in my book: couples who have been together for a long time, who may even spend their lives together – young and old – who stop having sex. It’s very common, but we never hear anything about it,” said Mossuz-Lavau.

In writing “Love and Sexual Behaviour in France”, Mossuz-Lavau sought to make her book as human as possible, forgoing scientific references for cultural ones drawn from popular literature, music and film.

She sets the tone in the introduction by quoting French philosopher Ruwen Ogien: “I am not offering an original definition of love. I leave the creative reader to find one that can satisfy everyone. But … it would be a bad idea to try.”

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Continue at FRANCE 24: Let’s talk about sex: New book sheds light on French sexual mores – France 24