In the footsteps of Laetitia Dosch 

Actress Laetitia Dosch makes an appointment with Karine Vasarino for a night stroll in Lausanne. The Franco-Swiss actress lived in the Vaudois capital between 2003 and 2008.

Sur les pas d’une actrice aux multiples facettes. Sur scène, elle propose des spectacles qui expérimentent les limites. Chauffeuse de salle, animale, elle tourne actuellement avec “Hate”, pièce dans laquelle elle joue nue avec un cheval.Personnalité atypique, l’étiquette de dingue de service lui a longtemps collé à la peau. Mais depuis sa nomination aux César pour son rôle dans “Jeune femme” (Caméra d’or à Cannes en 2017), Laetitia Dosch découvre le côté paillettes et glamour de son métier.Elle sera prochainement dans “Nos batailles” avec Romain Duris. Mais la belle rousse qui se trouvait moche à l’adolescence ne se considère pas comme une star.Laetitia Dosch donne rendez-vous à Karine Vasarino pour une balade nocturne à Lausanne. L’actrice franco-suisse a vécu dans la capitale vaudoise entre 2003 et 2008.

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Laetitia Dosch : la belle et la bête

It may be a story of skin, porous membrane between oneself and the world. The skin that Laetitia Dosch has diaphanous, like most redheads, but that’s not the reason why this delicate, almost transparent envelope seems to work as a sensor. Rather a matter of sensitivity, obviously. On this evening of June, the young woman vibrates with all her being , under the big pines of the Domaine d’O, in Montpellier, at the exit of the representation of Hate  : a creation of which she signs the text and the staging, in which she plays, and which, after Lausanne and Montpellier, arrives at Nanterre, where it is not necessary to miss it .

The show is in his image: a total singularity. The beautiful, out of a painting Botticelli, plays, skin against leather, with the beast. In this case a horse named Corazon (“heart”, in Spanish), with a gray trout dress. They are both naked, which is more noticeable at home than at home. It would seem that Laetitia Dosch does not do anything like another, from the beginning.

“I’ve always been the weird of the family,” she says. Its heterogeneous environment and Catholic ultratraditionnel 8 th arrondissement of Paris. “At the same time, my family was strange, in its way, we lived with my grandparents, uncles and aunts, and in the middle of animals, alive or dead. At home there were two parallel worlds: the adult ones, and the animals and me. But it’s good that I have fallen in the ” cathos ” , like that, I could not reproduce any scheme, “she says with this light humor, falsely naive, which characterizes it.

Squeaky Spirit

It is indeed in her private Catholic high school, however, that she discovers the theater, which saves her from a lonely and mute adolescence. And it is in the theater that she plunges, with lost body, she who appears today as one of the muses of the young French auteur cinema. With an eclecticism, a curiosity, an originality that make him make the difference between very different forms, which nevertheless still marks his identity.

She played Shakespeare alongside Eric Ruf, the boss of the Comédie-Française, or under the direction of the director Mélanie Leray, while ferreting into the much more experimental and performative world of choreographers Marco Berrettini and La Ribot. And she wrote her first show, Laetitia makes a fart … , parody of stand-up, where she plays a humorist a little weak, who makes jokes about the old, the Jews and the Blacks. Laetitia Dosch does not mind having a squeaky mind. [ . . . ]

Review: Strong Performances Anchor ‘The Apparition’

“The Apparition” sounds like the title of a horror movie, and this is not a case where the United States distributors of this French film have goosed up the original language title, which was, yes, “L’apparition.” There are several points in the movie during which the viewer can see the story line veer into genre territory, as when some of the characters, a disparate group convened for an investigation, discuss the possibility of working with an exorcist.

But the movie, directed by Xavier Giannoli, in fact aims for tragedy (which it nearly achieves) and enigmatic spirituality (and here’s where there’s a problem). Vincent Lindon plays Jacques, a journalist whose best friend and colleague is killed, practically right next to him, in the Middle East. At home nursing a blown-out ear, and PTSD, he is summoned by a Vatican representative. A young woman in rural France, Anna (Galatéa Bellugi) has seen a vision of the Virgin Mary, and is being celebrated by locals — and now, tourists on pilgrimages — as a potential new Bernadette of Lourdes. The church wants an investigation, to which the local priest sheltering Anna has strident objections.

Mr. Lindon, who carries his powerful masculinity with canny reserve, is superb as a man inquiring into a faith he had previously thought had nothing to do with him. But Ms. Bellugi is a real find; she inhabits her character, who, even as she hides her secrets, is so genuinely beatific that you can hear it in her breathing. Which makes it even more of a shame that the movie, which for two hours is an absorbing, detailed procedural, becomes so willfully diffuse in its final 20 minutes.