Wes Anderson’s upcoming film The French Dispatch to now release on 16 October

The French Dispatch features Timothee Chalamet, Benicio del Toro, Lea Seydoux, Mathieu Amalric and Jeffrey Wright.

Critically-acclaimed filmmaker Wes Anderson’s much-anticipated film The French Dispatch will now hit theaters on 16 October this year.

The Searchlight Pictures film was set to release worldwide on 24 July but has been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has disrupted the entire Hollywood release calendar.

Critically-acclaimed filmmaker Wes Anderson’s much-anticipated film The French Dispatch will now hit theaters on 16 October this year.

The Searchlight Pictures film was set to release worldwide on 24 July but has been postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic, which has disrupted the entire Hollywood release calendar.

Source: Coronavirus Outbreak: Wes Anderson’s upcoming film The French Dispatch to now release on 16 October – Firstpost

Does Polanski’s César award highlight a deep problem in French society?

The elite world of French cinema is divided over the 45th César Awards ceremony, the French equivalent of the Oscars. A movie by the controversial and divisive Franco-Polish filmmaker Roman Polanski won three awards, including the coveted Best Director prize. This was a bitter pill to swallow for many, including feminist groups who had called for a boycott of the ceremony. The incident once again ignited a fierce debate about the question of “separating the man from the artist”. Does this episode highlight a deep-rooted problem in French society? And are things slowly starting to change?

Source: Does Polanski’s César award highlight a deep problem in French society? – French connections

Why Adèle Haenel’s walkout over Roman Polanski matters

Adèle Haenel
Adèle Haenel

Last Friday evening in Paris, the 2020 César Award for Best Director was given to a rapist who assaulted a child – following this, a woman who was assaulted as a child by a film director walked out of the ceremony. The video of the event subsequently went viral over the weekend. Adèle Haenel – one of the lead actors in Portrait of a Lady on Fire – led the walk-out in protest at the prize awarded to Roman Polanski, while shouting “shame” and “bravo paedophile”.

A few pointers could be helpful in working out how this truly sick situation ever came about, and the cultural and political climate in France.In January of this year, the writer Vanessa Springora published a book, Le Consentement, in which she revealed that she was sexually assaulted at 14 by the writer Gabriel Matzneff, then aged 50. Matzneff, a writer who had published several apologias of paedophilia throughout the 1970s, was not made an outcast in French literary circles for his pronouncements – for instance, in 1977, that “the two most sensual beings I have known were a boy of 12 and a girl of 15”, or, in 1990, that he had had paid relations with boys as young as 11 in Manila. Continue reading “Why Adèle Haenel’s walkout over Roman Polanski matters”