France’s Netflix Rival Salto Will Launch in 2020 

All those French shows you wish you could stream could now be available on a new French streaming service, Salto.

Today, French regulators gave the go ahead to three of the country’s major broadcasters to start a joint online video streaming service, Salto, which is expected to launch in early 2020.

France Televisions (a public company) and M6 Groupe and TF1 Groupe (two private companies) are partnering for the venture.

Billed as a French alternative to Netflix, the service will feature French content from a variety of broadcasters and studios as well as some live channels. France Televisions owns France 2, France 3, France 4, France 5 and France Ô, M6 Groupe owns M6, W9, and 6ter, and TF1 Groupe owns TF1, TMC, TFX, TF1 and LCI. To avoid creating a streaming monopoly for the channels, the streaming site’s three broadcasting backers agreed to limit the use of their own content on the site to 40 percent of the offerings available.

In a press release announcing the verdict, Salto stated that the three companies are “combining their forces and proposing an ambitious, local response to the new expectations of the public, all while further reinforcing their active participation in French and European culture.”

Hollywood Reporter noted that’s Salto’s budget would be about $56 million for the first year.

The announcement of the French streaming service came in June 2018, but it only became a reality when regulators gave the go-ahead on August 12. France’s national competition regulator, Autorité de la concurrence, specified in a press release that the trio of broadcasters will have to submit to a series of agreements that will reduce the risk of “coordination” between the broadcasters to acquire the rights to French programs. The three parent companies also won’t be able to cross-promote the platform and their channels.

France isn’t the first country to start its own streaming service. In the U.K., the two largest broadcasters, ITV and the BBC, are launching BritBox, which offers the “best of British” TV and movies. Once given regulatory approval, BritBox will go live, likely this year.

While BritBox is available in North America, it has not yet been announced if Salto will be available Stateside.

Source: France’s Netflix Rival Salto Will Launch in 2020 – Frenchly

Netflix’s ‘Huge in France’ Is Almost Great

Netflix’s new fish-out-of-water comedy about a European megastar who relocates to Los Angeles is a strange kind of failure.

There are moments during Huge in France when you can perceive what the show might have been—a semi-satirical, semi-screwball comedy about the acute insanity of modern-day fame. The new eight-part Netflix series exists in a meta universe similar to HBO’s Entourage, in that it’s loosely based on the real experiences of an actor and comedian, Gad Elmaleh. The plight of the show’s Gad (he refers to himself in the third person, alors, c’est vraiment Gad) is that he’s a huge star. In France. In real life, this is also true for Elmaleh, who by most metrics is a bona fide celebrity: He has 1.8 million Instagram followers, he once sold out Paris’s Olympia theater for a record-breaking seven consecutive weeks, and his former partner is the granddaughter of Prince Rainier III of Monaco and Grace Kelly. In France, Elmaleh is Jerry Seinfeld. In America, though? If a celebrity lands in a city where no one has ever heard of him, does he make a sound? Continue reading “Netflix’s ‘Huge in France’ Is Almost Great”

Why You Should Binge-Watch “Plan Cœur” on Netflix – Frenchly

Netflix’s newest French addition, Plan Cœur, by Chris Lang and Noémie Saglio, has evoked a strong reaction (as expected) from the French audiences. The French have mostly ridiculed it as a binge-worthy, feel-good show (makes sense when most of their movies have far from happily-ever-after endings). But we would like to point out… what is so wrong with a binge-worthy, feel-good show?

A sort-of French take on Sex and the City, Plan Cœur (or The Hook-up Plan in English) focuses on the lives of three Parisians: Elsa, played by Zita Hanrot, Emilie (Milou), played by Joséphine Draï, and Charlotte (Chacha), played by Sabrina Ouazani, who each have their own struggles, daily battles, and inner conflicts. The main character, Elsa, has been chronically single for a while and still getting through a very rough breakup. Her friends, naturally, hire a male hooker to lift up her spirits. What happens after is a surprise for everyone [ . . . ]

Continue at FRENCHLY: Why You Should Binge-Watch “Plan Cœur” on Netflix – Frenchly

Netflix’s ‘To Each, Her Own’ Is An Ambitious, Overcomplicated French Film

 

Some movies are so thoroughly mediocre that you just want to yell at them to be better. That is the case with the French romantic comedy To Each, Her Own. The story is bursting with ideas, so many ideas, in fact, that it could’ve been something great. Instead, To Each, Her Own, much like its protagonist, wants it all. By trying to speak to so many ideas, the movie ends up saying very little. The ambition of director Myriam Aziza (who also co-wrote the script with Denyse Rodriguez-Tome) is admirable. However, her Netflix film badly needs someone who can rein in the unwieldy script [ . . . ]

Read full review at THE DAILY DOT: Netflix’s ‘To Each, Her Own’ Is An Ambitious, Overcomplicated French Film