Commemorating the Global May ’68 Events 

Fifty years after the transformative May ’68 student-led protests in France, universities and cultural institutions across the country are presenting diverse programs and events that revisit the spirit of the ’60s in all of its facets, from revolution to social activism and more. Check back here periodically for an updated listing of events.

Read More: Commemorating the Global May ’68 Events | French Culture

“Jane and Serge: family album”: the mythical photos of Birkin and Gainsbourg by Andrew Birkin

“Jane and Serge: family album”: the few words that define the new exhibition of the Museum of Fine Arts in Calais perfectly summarize the relationship of the iconic couple. A man, a woman, a family in the broadest sense, the 1960s, freedom and love, all told in about sixty photos captured by Andrew Birkin, Jane’s brother.

More story and video at Source: “Jane et Serge : album de famille” : les photos mythiques de Birkin et Gainsbourg par Andrew Birkin

11 things we learned from Fabien Cousteau – who lived under water for 31 days

The food was ‘really, really awful’.

In 2014, Fabien Cousteau and his team embarked on a mission to break the world record for the number of days spent living under water.

They set up temporary quarters on Aquarius, an 81-ton vessel that serves as the world’s only underwater marine laboratory located nine miles off the coast of the Florida Keys and 63 feet beneath the sea.

Then 31 days later, the team emerged back on the shore, breaking the record formerly set by Mr Cousteau’s grandfather – the famous ocean explorer Jacques Cousteau – by a day.

Four years later, Mr Cousteau relives his Mission 31 experience on Reddit’s Ask Me Anything and here are 11 things we learned from the aquanaut. [ . . . ]

Read More at Source: THE IRISH NEWS 11 things we learned from Fabien Cousteau – who lived under water for 31 days – The Irish News

Julia Child “France is a Feast” exhibit

I love these rarely seen black and white photographs taken by Paul Child in France between 1948 and 1954.

The recent exhibit features 60 rarely seen black-and-white photographs taken between 1948 and 1954 along with notebooks, logs, letters and a Rolleiflex camera that Paul Child liked to use because it allowed him to look down and capture people unobtrusively.

Paul’s wife, Julia Child, became a celebrity cookbook author and “The French Chef” on television.

Julia Child
Julia smoking a cig in Cassis 1950
Juila Child2
Julia Child, telephone booth

First festival: four “Photographic stories” in the den of the abbey of Silvacane

The Abbey of Silvacane in La Roque d’Anthéron (Bouches-du-Rhône) hosts until September 30, 2017 its first festival of “Photographic Stories”. Four projects, led by five international photographers – Hélène David, Ritta Ikonen and Karoline Hjorth forming a duo, Corey Arnold and Amy Friend – give their singular vision of the world. On the menu of the journey: commitment, poetry, humor.

Source: First festival: four “Photographic stories” in the den of the abbey of Silvacane

Paris, day two: Walker Evans exhibit at the Pompidou

Today we visited Paris’ Pompidou Museum for their new exhibit of the great American photographer, Walker Evans. Awesome event, brilliant photography. My wife expressed how crazy it is to travel to France to better appreciate an artist so quintessentially American.


Walker Evans (1903-1975) is one of the most important American photographers of the 20th century . His photographs of America in crisis in the 1930s, his projects published in Fortune magazine in the 1940s and 1950s and his “documentary style” have influenced generations of photographers and artists. By his attention to the details of everyday life, to the urban banality and the people of little, it has largely contributed to define the visibility of American culture of the 20th century. Some of his photographs have become icons.

A retrospective of the work of Evans, the exhibition presented by the Center Pompidou proposes a thematic approach and unpublished through three hundred photographs of time. It highlights the obsession of the photographer for certain subjects such as roadside architecture, storefronts, signs, typographical signs or faces. It invites the public to better understand what is undoubtedly the heart of Walker Evans’ work: the passionate search for the fundamental characteristics of American vernacular culture. In an interview in 1971, the photographer explains this appeal in these terms: “You do not want your work to come from art; You want it to originate in life? It is in the street. I do not feel at ease in a museum anymore. I do not want to visit them. I do not want anyone to tell me anything. I do not want to see “accomplished” art. I am interested in what is called the vernacular. For example, the architecture accomplished, I mean , does not interest me, I prefer to seek the American vernacular. “

In the United States, the vernacular defines forms of popular expression used by ordinary people for utilitarian purposes: everything that is created outside art, outside the circuits of production and legitimation, everything that ends up Constitute a specifically American culture. These are all small details of the everyday environment revealing a form of “americanism”: the wooden barracks of the roadside, how the merchant disposes of the goods in his shop window, the silhouette of the Ford T, typography Pseudo-cursive of the Coca-Cola banners. It is a central notion to understand American culture. The vernacular was present in the literature as early as the 19th century, but it was only at the end of the 1920s that it was the subject of an initial analysis in the field of architecture.

After an introduction devoted to the modernist beginnings of Evans, the exhibition brings together, in a first part, the main subjects that Evans has never stopped tracking: the typography of a sign, a display, a shop front … Then, the journey reveals how Evans himself adopted the operating modes or the visual forms of vernacular photography by becoming, during a project, architectural, catalog, street photographer, while explicitly claiming an approach artist.
This exhibition is the first major retrospective devoted to the work of Walker Evans in a French museum. She retraces, from the first photographs of the late 1920s to the Polaroids of the 1970s, The entire career of the artist through an unprecedented collection of period photographs from the most important American public collections (Metropolitan Museum and Museum of Modern Art in New York, J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, Art Institute Of Chicago, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, etc.) and about fifteen private collectors. Through a hundred documents and objects, it also places a great deal of importance on the whole of postcards, enamelled plates, cut-out images and ephemera graphics that Walker Evans has collected throughout his life. ) And about fifteen private collectors. Through a hundred documents and objects, it also places a great deal of importance on the whole of postcards, enamelled plates, cut-out images and ephemera graphics that Walker Evans has collected throughout his life. ) And about fifteen private collectors. Through a hundred documents and objects, it also places a great deal of importance on the whole of postcards, enamelled plates, cut-out images and ephemera graphics that Walker Evans has collected throughout his life.

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Not Walker Evans.