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Actress Adele Haenel accuses Manager of sexual harassment as #metoo Strikes French cinema

French actress Adele Haenel has accused a manager of raping her when she was a teen working on her very first feature film. Haenel, today 30, maintained in a meeting with French press outlet Mediap…

French actress Adele Haenel has accused a manager of raping her when she was a teen working on her very first feature film.

Haenel, today 30, maintained in a meeting with French press outlet Mediapart on Monday she had become the goal of”permanent sexual harassment” from director Christophe Ruggia if both worked with her debut film, The Devils, once she was 12 to 15.

She stated he forcefully kissed her neck and could touch her on the thighs and chest.

The celebrity, who has won two César awards — the French equivalent of the Oscars — included that she wouldn’t make an official complaint to the authorities but that she’d determined to come forward if she’d learned that Ruggia was likely a new film with teens.

She enticed the French judiciary method of not being intense enough on sexual abusers.

The French Society of Directors has provided its service to the celebrity and voiced its”respect and fame” at a statement issued on Monday. Additionally, it has expelled Ruggia.

Asked about the event on Wednesday, the French Minister for Justice Nicole Belloubet, stated that Haenel was incorrect to discredit the machine and encouraged her to submit a complaint.

Source: Actress Adele Haenel accuses Manager of sexual harassment as #metoo Strikes French cinema |

France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels

In a win for planet Earth, as of 2015 all commercial buildings in France must have at least partial coverage of their rooftop in solar panels or plants.

In this time of doomsday-like predictions where our environmental health is concerned, it’s all hands on deck. We are coming to the conclusion, hopefully not too late, that every little bit of conservation counts.

There is a shift in general consciousness that’s begun to happen. We’re becoming aware of the impact we humans have, and the myriad ways we make that impact. With the purchase of a plastic water bottle as opposed to a reusable one. Using grocery store bags instead of bringing your own. Buying new when used would be perfectly acceptable. These are a few examples of shifts that have started taking place. We see now, how easy it is to carry our own bottle, or our own bag, or shop consignment.

It’s been far too easy, for far too long, to buy into the idea that we as individuals don’t have an impact. One bottle won’t make a difference. One bag won’t hurt anything. But not only is that incorrect, but it also doesn’t really speak to the heart of the matter, which is that we’re all in this together. How we individually live, is how we collectively live. So, not only can one person have a huge impact, we have somewhat of an obligation at this point, to us and to each other, to live as we do. To act like it’s all connected – because it is [ . . . ]

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Trump’s Cheese Tariffs May Be His Most Normal Trade Policy

If you’re a fan of European cheeses, I’m sorry to report the price outlook is not Gouda.

The U.S. and the European Union have a long-running trade dispute over airplane subsidies. Each side alleges that the other is subsidizing its major commercial-aircraft manufacturer (Boeing and Airbus, respectively) in violation of World Trade Organization rules. The WTO says both sides are right: Boeing and Airbus both receive improper subsidies. Soon, the WTO will say how much in retaliatory tariffs each side may impose to punish the other for these violations. And in preparation for that decision, the U.S. has prepared a list of $25 billion worth of European exports we might subject to 100 percent tariffs.

The list reads like an order sheet from Dean & DeLuca.

Tariffs may be applied to cheeses including Gouda, Stilton, Roquefort, and Parmigiano-Regianno. Olive oil. Olives. Dried cherries. Apricot jam, peach jam, currant jelly, pear juice. Ham, including Proscuitto di Parma, Jamón Ibérico, Jambon de Bayonne and any of the other delicious European hams. Wine. Whiskey. Brandy (e.g., Cognac). If you might buy it to throw a fabulous cocktail party, it may soon be subject to a prohibitive tariff.

Meanwhile, the EU has released its own list of goods it might tariff because of our subsidies to Boeing — it includes live lobsters, orange juice, and rum.

Donald Trump, who doesn’t drink, says you shouldn’t worry about wine tariffs because the best wines are American anyway. But while high tariffs that upset coastal snobs would seem to combine two of Trump’s passions, his strategy of threatening these tariffs is actually one of the more ordinary parts of his trade policy. Long before Trump was president, the U.S. and Europe have exchanged punitive tariffs on luxury and specialty goods as tools to push for resolutions to valid trade grievances [ . . . ]

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