Explore French Culture from Your Couch

In light of the Coronavirus pandemic, many of us are home-bound this winter. But culture can provide a thrilling escape, even from your couch. Below, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite podcast episodes, videos, playlists, and more so you can take a deep dive into contemporary and classic French and Francophone cultures––without leaving your apartment.

Listen to The Thing About France Podcast

Did you know that David Sedaris loves French-style frozen food? Or that being in Paris makes Gloria Steinem feel like she’s in a village? Podcast fans will love The Thing About France, which explores the fascinating and complicated relationship between France and the United States through intimate with artist Mickalene Thomas, chef Daniel Rose (Le Coucou), Jonathan Galassi (President and Publisher at Farrar, Straus and Giroux), and many more! Listen here.

Dive into Geopolitics with the French Embassy’s FrancoFiles Podcast

FrancoFiles gives listeners a chance to explore geopolitical issues and get a behind the scenes look at French diplomatic and consular missions in Washington D.C. through the podcast medium. Learn about La Maison Française, biodiversity, the Michelin Guide, and more.[ . . . ] Continue reading “Explore French Culture from Your Couch”

Life in a French housing project remembered in photos – Banlieue Project

Faced with the planned demolition of the housing project where she grew up, Mahye decided to organise an open-air photography exhibition. It takes residents of “Les Groux”, in the French suburb of Fresnes, on a journey through their shared childhoods. The Banlieue Project team went to meet her to find out more.

Banlieue Project is a platform for residents of France’s disadvantaged suburbs to tell their own stories. We provide the camera and they film their experiences to break down clichés about the French “banlieues”.

Watch at: Life in a French housing project remembered in photos – Banlieue Project

JR: Chronicles at Brooklyn Museum

Over the past two decades, JR has expanded the meaning of public art through his ambitious projects that give visibility and agency to a broad spectrum of people around the world. Showcasing murals, photographs, videos, films, dioramas, and archival materialsJR: Chronicles is the first major exhibition in North America of works by the French-born artist. Working at the intersections of photography, social engagement, and street art, JR collaborates with communities by taking individual portraits, reproducing them at a monumental scale, and wheat pasting them—sometimes illegally—in nearby public spaces.

This soaring multimedia installation traces JR’s career from his early documentation of graffiti artists as a teenager in Paris to his large-scale architectural interventions in cities worldwide to his more recent digitally collaged murals that create collective portraits of diverse publics. The centerpiece of the exhibition is The Chronicles of New York City, a new epic mural of more than one thousand New Yorkers that is accompanied by audio recordings of each person’s story. All of the projects on view honor the voices of everyday people and demonstrate JR’s ongoing commitment to community, collaboration, and civic discourse.

JR: Chronicles is part of the Brooklyn Falls for France cultural season and is curated by Sharon Matt Atkins, Director of Exhibitions and Strategic Initiatives, and Drew Sawyer, Phillip Leonian and Edith Rosenbaum Leonian Curator, Photography, Brooklyn Museum.

Source: JR: Chronicles at Brooklyn Museum | French Culture

‘Monet and Boston’ will celebrate a strong connection, collection at the MFA

Several Impressionist paintings are coming home for the occasion.

By the standards of even the most feverish of Monet fans, the standing display of the Impressionist master at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts is pretty damn good. On any given visit, you’re likely to see 10 or 12 at a time — luminous grainstacks, shimmering waterlilies, a mountain glade, and more often than not, that gleefully bizarre portrait of Camille, the painter’s wife, swathed in a demonic kimono.

So how would you feel about seeing, say, 35 Monet paintings all at once? That’s the full complement of the museums’ holdings. Out they’ll come in April, reunited for the first time in a quarter century [ . . . ]

Continue at: ‘Monet and Boston’ will celebrate a strong connection, collection at the MFA – The Boston Globe