The French Paradox – a certain je ne sais quoi

In 1992, French scientists Serge Renaud and Michel de Lorgeril concluded that despite a diet rich in saturated fat and other harmful lifestyle habits — especially noting a very high rate of heavy cigarette smoking — French people have a low incidence of cardiovascular issues.They termed this phenomenon the “French Paradox” in which they hypothesized that the resveratrol in red wine was responsible for this protective ability. Not that I’m promoting a life of heavy smoking and excessive drinking but there seems to be a link between taking foods that contain this bio-active ingredient and protection from cardiovascular diseases and this requires some further thought and investigation.

Resveratrol has been identified in more than 70 different plant species such as grapevines, legumes and pines and its synthesis seems to increase in response to injuries, UV radiation and fungal infections. | Read more at: The French Paradox – a certain je ne sais quoi – Thegardenisland.com: Lifestyles

Raising a glass to the language of intoxication

 

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Language notes on the French art of drinking

As you would expect, there are many French maxims relating to booze. Alfred de Musset, a 19th-century poet, was not too picky with his preferences: Qu’importe le flacon, pourvu qu’on ait l’ivresse – “Nevermind the bottle, as long as you’re intoxicated”. But perhaps the neatest summation of alcohol’s role in French life came from Napoleon, who once said, “In victory, you deserve Champagne. In defeat you need it.”

Autumn is upon us, and the grape harvest is under way in vineyards, from Reims to the Rhône Valley, so here we look at French expressions that relate to enjoying a tipple and having one too many.

We often think of the French as moderate – or, at least, quite sensible – drinkers, but in 2013 the phrase beuverie express appeared in the country’s official journal. It became part of the language and ‘binge drinking’ had officially arrived in France…

It is by no means at UK levels but with this in mind, a stock familiar phrase for saying someone drinks too much is boire comme un trou – literally ‘to drink like a hole’. Similar to this are boire comme une éponge (drink like a sponge) or boire comme un évier (drink like a sink).

To drink oneself into a stupor is boire jusqu’à tomber, while to drink someone under the table is faire rouler quelqu’un sous la table.

Conversely, someone who demurely sips at their drink can be said to boire à petits coups. Other words for ‘to sip’ are siroter and gobeloter.

Need to hand out a few words of warning in French about the inhibition-removing effects of a few glasses of wine? Try Ce que le sobre tient au coeur est sur la langue du buveur – “What the sober hold in their heart is on the drinker’s tongue” This is a rather long winded way of saying in vino veritas.

Cul sec! (‘dry bottom’, or ‘Bottoms up!’).

 

Source: Raising a glass to the language of intoxication

The Joy of Sharing with Vin de France … for as little as $10!

Wines from Vin de France are ideal for sharing with friends and family. The variety of grapes, colors and styles means there’s always the right bottle for any occasion, from relaxed snacking to special celebrations. Whether you’re enjoying an impromptu picnic or a carefully-planned feast, Vin de France wines always make the moment special.

Happily, these exciting bottles are easy to spot: look for the Vin de France name on the label, along with details of grape varieties and vintage. Everything is crystal-clear, and thanks to wallet-friendly prices, wine lovers get more for their money. [ . . . ]

More at: The Joy of Sharing with Vin de France | Wine Enthusiast Magazine

Why this French wine might be the most versatile red around

Cotes-du-Rhone

Cotes-du-Rhone may be an ideal all-purpose red wine: It’s great to sip by itself, and it pairs beautifully with a wide variety of foods, from braised chicken and beef to hearty grilled meats. The Chateau de Marjolet 2015 is outstanding, and a terrific value at just $15. This week’s recommendations include two lighter reds from Italy and France, an Oregon pinot noir and a flowery, fruity white from Armenia [ . . . ]

More: Why this French wine might be the most versatile red around – The Washington Post