One of the Most Iconic Bookstores in the World Is in Trouble—but You Can Help

Shakespeare and Company has weathered many storms, but the pandemic has been the most devastating of them all.

For over a century the legendary bookstore Shakespeare and Company has beamed out from the Left Bank of Paris like a lighthouse of literature.

The former 16th-century monastery on Rue de la Bûcherie, and its previous site not far away at 12 Rue de l’Odéon, has been a home away from home for the Lost Generation in the 1920s and the Beatnik generation in the 1950s, a publisher and reading resource for the likes of James Joyce and Ernest Hemingway, and shelter for the estimated 30,000 “tumbleweeds”—young writers and enthusiasts allowed to stay for free—over the years.

But the economic disaster wrought by the coronavirus pandemic has hit independent bookstores in France, including this timeless Anglophone institution, hard. Deemed “non-essential” by the government even during the country’s second lockdown, they were forced to close to in-person customers, while commerce for online behemoths like Amazon has soared. Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo herself warned city-goers: “Don’t buy on Amazon. Amazon is the death of our bookshops and our neighborhood life.”

Continue reading “One of the Most Iconic Bookstores in the World Is in Trouble—but You Can Help”

Why Oh Why Do I Love Paris?

When the pandemic lifts, all good Americans will want to go back to Paris.

As Cole Porter’s song says, “I love Paris in the springtime. I love Paris in the fall. I love Paris in the winter when it drizzles. I love Paris in the summer when it sizzles.” I suspect most people do. And with the prospect next year of being able to visit again this glorious city, which Ernest Hemingway famously called, “a moveable feast,” I am already thinking about all I want to see and all I want eat.

I’ve been visiting Paris since I was in college, though I never lived there for an extended period of time, so that I have been able to pull back from its charms and discover them anew whenever I go back. The obvious appeal of the best-known tourists sites—the Arc de Triomphe, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, Versailles, Notre Dame—can be seen in mere days, but the city’s beauty, breadth and depth are what Thomas Jefferson said about the city: “A walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of life.” Continue reading “Why Oh Why Do I Love Paris?”

10 ‘Emily in Paris’ Locations You Can Visit in Real Life

From well-known spots like the Palais-Royal to museums like L’Atelier des Lumières, here are 10 “Emily in Paris” filming locations you can visit in real life.

If you’ve watched Emily in Paris, the new Netflix show about a young marketing executive from Chicago who moves to Paris to bring an American perspective to a French marketing firm, you likely have a few thoughts about it. Love it or hate it, there’s one thing we can probably all agree on: The setting is absolutely stunning.

Glamorous shots over the Seine and scenes set in iconic locales reaffirm my personal belief that Paris is one of the most beautiful cities in the world. We’ve rounded up some of the filming locations depicted in Emily in Paris, so you can walk in Emily’s footsteps during your next trip to the city — or just daydream about the City of Lights.

1. Pont Alexandre III

Pont Alexandre III at sunrise, Paris, France
CREDIT: GETTY IMAGES/500PX

In a city full of picturesque bridges, Pont Alexandre III stands out as one of the most beautiful. Savoir, the French marketing firm where Emily works, films a perfume advertisement here with their client, Maison Lavaux. With an ornate design and views of the Grand Palais and Eiffel Tower, it’s a truly stunning place to walk.

2. Jardin du Palais-Royal

Emily In Paris (L to R) ASHLEY PARK as MINDY and LILY COLLINS as EMILY in episode 101 of Emily In Paris
CREDIT: COURTESY OF NETFLIX

The beautifully landscaped grounds of a 17th-century palace called the Palais-Royal (now government buildings) are where Emily meets her new friend, Mindy, a nanny living in Paris, during her lunch break. It’s located in the center of Paris, just steps from the Louvre, making it the perfect place to stop while touring the city.

3. L’Atelier des Lumières

EMILY IN PARIS (L to R) LILY COLLINS as EMILY and LUCAS BRAVO as GABRIEL in episode 105 of EMILY IN PARIS
CREDIT: COURTESY OF NETFLIX

Emily joins her neighbor (and love interest), Gabriel, and his girlfriend, Camille, on a visit to L’Atelier des Lumières, an abandoned factory-turned-art space. The innovative experience opened in 2018, and right now, visitors can be completely immersed in the works of Renoir, Chagall, and Monet during the “Journeys Around the Mediterranean” exhibition.

4. Palais Garnier

The staircase of the Palais Garnier Opéra National de Paris
CREDIT: SYLVAIN SONNET/GETTY IMAGES

With an Audrey Hepburn-inspired look, Emily visits the Palais Garnier for a showing of “Swan Lake.” The truly impressive opera house was built in the 1800s, and today, it’s probably most famous as the setting for “The Phantom of the Opera.”

Continue reading “10 ‘Emily in Paris’ Locations You Can Visit in Real Life”

6 Quaint Villages In Provence, France You Must Visit

When it comes to quaint French towns and villages, Cucuron, Roussillon, Lourmarin, Lauris, Gordes, and Apt in the Luberon area of Provence do not disappoint.

The Luberon, part of the Vaucluse region of Provence in the south of France, is known for its historic and even ancient villages. Many are located on mountaintops with expansive views of the forests, fields, vineyards, and farms of the Luberon, and nearby are the famous lavender fields. The quaint villages usually consist of cafes, small town squares, medieval churches, art galleries, boutiques selling locally made products, and restaurants in addition to residents’ homes. Small hotels and bed and breakfasts are also available in each village. Here, we share the best villages to visit, plus recommended restaurants and hotels.

1. Cucuron

The town center of the village of Cucuron has a vast, rectangular pond with spring-fed water and 200-year-old plane trees towering over it. Cafes, restaurants, and a small hotel dot the square. Every Tuesday morning there’s a food and flea market at the pond, where locals get their produce and necessities. At the end of July is a flea market with antiques, tapestries, rugs, china, bric-a-brac, and artworks. Continue reading “6 Quaint Villages In Provence, France You Must Visit”

Paris Beaches Open with Floating Cinema on the Seine

Paris Plages (Paris Beaches) opened this year with an outdoor movie showing on the banks of the River Seine, as the city is coping with the COVID-19 pandemic.

MK2 Cinemas partnered with the city of Paris to organize this year’s event.

“It’s been years, we’re creating operations to take the cinema out of the cinema rooms as a promotion tool, and after the few months of confinement, we thought we needed a way to tell to the people and to tell to the world that cinemas are open in Paris, that Paris is one of the worldwide capital of cinema, and also to create a way for them to enjoy with their families a magnificent night, said Elisha Karmitz, CEO of MK2 Cinemas.

On Saturday people watched the 2018 French comedy “Le grand bain” from boats or on deck chairs on the Seine’s banks. Some said they felt safer at an open-air screening.

“I already went back to the cinema once, wearing a mask, but I have to admit there is still some apprehension to go back to cinema,” said Luc Bouvier, an attendee. “But here, since it is an open-air screening, there are less doubts, we feel safer.”

Paris Plages is an annual event held in July and August during which roads along the River Seine are closed to turn the waterfront into beach front.

The event was initiated in 2002 by the newly elected Socialist Mayor of Paris Bertrand Delanoë, to help people cope with the hot summer in the city.

Source: Paris Beaches Open with Floating Cinema on the Seine | Voice of America – English