Paris by Mouth: Our Top 35 Paris Restaurants 

PARIS RESTAURANTS

Where to eat? Here is our short list of 35 favorite Paris restaurants, which we’ve ranked based on anonymous and repeat visits. We never accept press invitations or freebies, so you can trust that our opinion is still independent, after nearly a decade of reviewing Paris restaurants.Feel free to share your reaction to this ranking and your own suggested favorites in the comments! [ . . . ]

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France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels

In a win for planet Earth, as of 2015 all commercial buildings in France must have at least partial coverage of their rooftop in solar panels or plants.

In this time of doomsday-like predictions where our environmental health is concerned, it’s all hands on deck. We are coming to the conclusion, hopefully not too late, that every little bit of conservation counts.

There is a shift in general consciousness that’s begun to happen. We’re becoming aware of the impact we humans have, and the myriad ways we make that impact. With the purchase of a plastic water bottle as opposed to a reusable one. Using grocery store bags instead of bringing your own. Buying new when used would be perfectly acceptable. These are a few examples of shifts that have started taking place. We see now, how easy it is to carry our own bottle, or our own bag, or shop consignment.

It’s been far too easy, for far too long, to buy into the idea that we as individuals don’t have an impact. One bottle won’t make a difference. One bag won’t hurt anything. But not only is that incorrect, but it also doesn’t really speak to the heart of the matter, which is that we’re all in this together. How we individually live, is how we collectively live. So, not only can one person have a huge impact, we have somewhat of an obligation at this point, to us and to each other, to live as we do. To act like it’s all connected – because it is [ . . . ]

Continue at Source: France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels

Artist ‘Humiliated’ After His Nude Sculpture Was Covered With Underwear for Paris Event

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The United Nations’ cultural agency has been criticized for covering up the genitalia of a series of nude sculptures with underwear.

Works by French sculptor Stéphane Simon, which show nude, classical-style figures taking selfies, were being displayed in Paris during UNESCO’s European Heritage Days event in September.

But officials decided to cover the offending parts of the artworks with underwear, to the shock of Simon and the ridicule of arts commentators.

Source: Artist ‘Humiliated’ After His Nude Sculpture Was Covered With Underwear for Paris Event | KTLA

Where to Eat in Paris: The Best 13 New Restaurants to Try Right Now

To make choosing where to eat in Paris as painless as possible, we’ve done the “hard” graft for you by testing out 13 of the newest, most talked-about places in the city. From creative cuisine hailing from Israel to the chef that’s shaking things up at the Eiffel Tower, we’ve got you covered.

1. Shabour, A (Michelin) Star In The Making

Every dish here is testimony to the chefs’ inexhaustible inspiration. And teamed with hospitality that’s rarely seen in trendy Paris restaurants of this caliber, Shabour certainly packs one mighty punch.

With several restaurants under their belt in Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, London and Paris, Shabour, meaning ‘hangover’ in Hebrew, is the clan’s third restaurant and first independent endeavor in the French capital.  Alongside the enigmatic Assaf Granit is his clan, Dan Yosha and Uri Navon in the kitchen, and Tomer Lanzmann as head host and all-round ambiance-setter en salle.

As far as the décor goes, it’s simple. And that’s the way they wanted it. A former jazz club, the space is entirely candlelit. The stone walls and waxed cement floors provide the backdrop for an open kitchen encased in a marvelous jade-green marble counter for diners to perch at, giving the restaurant a perfectly achieved result.

In a silent ritual of swift movements and the occasional hint of a smile in his icy blue eyes, lead maestro Assaf deposits utensils in front of diners in preparation for each dish, his hands, covered in cryptic black tattoos, sporadically emerging from the shadows.

He lays dinky forks on the counter. An oyster appears adorned with zata herbs (similar to wild oregano), apple and shallot juice, all laid on top of a wooden stand like an artwork, ready to be blowtorched before we swallow it, reeling from the burst of flavor as it slowly imparts its notes in our mouths.

Another stand-out dish includes scorched leek plunged in vegetable stock and filled with labanais (yoghurt-like drink) and porcini mushrooms accompanied by a halloumi crumble and stock that’s meant to recall a journey through the woods. And what a journey it is, each dish pulling us deeper into a world unknown where flavor becomes all that matters.

Next up, Assaf lays out a porcelain egg cup, ready to be filled by Dan with four types of egg: poached, marinated for 48 hours in black tea with ginger, relish of carrots and onions, raisins, tahini, Egyptian spinach, salmon eggs, and poutarde. Explosive. As is Uri’s exceptional amuse bouche of escargot-shaped apple roasted with olive oil and arak, and pickled pink and white beetroot stuffed with brie and plum purée, prepped like a “small tower of Babylon,” as he describes it while he rolls it into shape behind the counter in front of us.

A flurry of dishes, each one more sophisticated than the next and interwoven with accents from a faraway land; the genius behind each mouthful is the scattered positioning of the ingredients on the colorful mismatched porcelain plates. The result is that no mouthful is ever the same.

Here, time stalls as the experience takes you to places you’ve never wandered before. When we left some hours later, we were floating – merry from the wine (which flowed) and not uncomfortably bloated from the food. The next morning however, starting the day proved a little less smooth, but then again, we were warned – the restaurant isn’t called Shabour for nothing.

Shabour – 19 Rue Saint-Sauveur, 75002 Paris Continue reading “Where to Eat in Paris: The Best 13 New Restaurants to Try Right Now”