Yann Tiersen at the Royal Albert Hall | Live review – The Upcoming

Yann Tiersen is a multi-instrumentalist who rose to fame when songs from three of his albums were used to score Amelie, and most of his music seems as though it was written with films in mind. His latest release, EUSA, moves away from the busy, dense sounds that characterised his earlier work and focuses instead […]

Source: Yann Tiersen at the Royal Albert Hall | Live review – The Upcoming

New Yann Tiersen Release and Contest | French Culture

Following the release of EUSA, a brand new album of piano compositions recorded live at Abbey Road, Yann Tiersen is launching a competition to find the best and most interesting interpretations of tracks from the album.

There are three categories for entry: Best Overall Performance, Most Interesting Location and Best Non-Piano Performance. Fans are asked to upload their interpretations tohttp://myeusa.com and three winners, chosen by Yann Tiersen, will win a signed toy piano (the same kind that Tiersen performs with on the current tour), plus signed EUSA goodies. The competition closes on January 13, 2017, and winners will be announced on January 23. Further information available fromhttp://myeusa.com.

Watch + share a brand new video of Tiersen playing his track “Yuzin” live at Abbey Road here  […]

More About This: New Yann Tiersen Release and Contest | French Culture

Yann Tiersen’s Favourite Albums

Baker’s DozenIn Place: Yann Tiersen’s Favourite Albums
Fred Bowler , November 2nd, 2016 09:56


With his ninth album, EUSA, out now, the French composer and multi-instrumentalist takes Fred Jage-Bowler from the Velvets to Bill Callahan via NEU!, Vashti Bunyan and Joanna Newsom on a tour of his favourite records

READ FULL STORY at Source: The Quietus | Features | Baker’s Dozen | In Place: Yann Tiersen’s Favourite Albums

“There is infinity through a telescope; infinity through a microscope”: DiS Meets Yann Tiersen

I speak to Yann Tiersen a few hours before he is due to play the Gewandhaus in Leipzig, as he continues to tour his new album Eusa. A collection of ten piano songs originally released as sheet music, Tiersen decided to record the songs after playing them live. In the midst of his tour, I find Tiersen unwell with a miserable autumn cold. “At least I don’t have to sing tonight!” he laughs, before coughing and spluttering over the phone to me some more. Despite being so unwell that he clearly should be in bed with whatever the French equivalent of Lemsip is, he continues enthusiastically. Nothing, especially not a meagre cold, will stop him conveying the love he has for his latest project – a musical mapping of his home in Ushant.

It doesn’t seem like eighteen years since Tiersen’s 1998 solo album Le Phare, or fifteen years since 2001’s Bafta winning Amélie brought him into the musical consciousness of so many. Made up of tracks from his first three studio albums, La Valse Des Monstres (1995), Rue Des Cascades(1996) and the aforementioned Le Phare, the Amélie soundtrack felt like a love letter to the bustling Parisian area of Montmartre; Le Phare, by contrast, was an album where the remote, desolate landscape of Ushant inspired Tiersen to write in self-imposed seclusion on the island. Eusa, as it is known in the local Breton language, is again providing inspiration for Tiersen’s ninth studio album; however, rather than being merely inspired by Ushant, the album is Ushant, as Tiersen uses music to paint a vivid picture of his home landscape.

READ ENTIRE: “There is infinity through a telescope; infinity through a microscope”: DiS Meets Yann Tiersen / In Depth // Drowned In Sound