Exploring France through its famous wine regions

There’s a famous quote by Rumi that best describes the importance of a fine wine, “Either give me more wine or leave me alone”

Only a true connoisseur of wine would connect to this saying and only a true lover of wine would know the real worth of a French wine. France, besides being famous for its rich culture, age-old traditions and grand architecture, the country is globally renowned for its wine. The world swears by French wines and every region here produces its own beverage. So let’s take a trip to some famous French vineyards that will tell you everything to plan your vineyard trip in France.

Wine of Provence

Your French vineyard tour won’t be complete without tasting the wine of Provence. This breathtaking French region is just a few hours drive from Nice and is known for producing some fantastic wines. This entire territory is dotted with vineyards and one can also enjoy wine tasting experiences here. The warm climate and the region’s proximity to the sea makes it a perfect place for grapes plantation. Syrah, Cabernet, Sauvignon, Cinsault and Clairette are some of the best wine brands here.

Wine of Loire ValleyCredit: iStock

Wine of Loire Valley

Loire Valley is another famous wine producing region in France. Some of the popular vineyards here are located in Anjou-Saumur, Touraine, The Pays Nantais and Central Vineyards. Loire Valley wines are light and that’s what makes them so popular. One can choose from a stunning selection of red wines, white wines and sweet roses.

Wine of Burgundy Credit: iStock

Wine of Burgundy

Burgundy is a historical French territory famous for its vineyard regions. The wine regions of Burgundy include Côte de Nuits, Châblis, Côte de Beaune, Côte Chalonnaise and Beaujolais, to name a few. The wine produced in this region is considered complex, which makes it very expensive. The region also produces some amazing white wines made from Chardonnay, and red wines made from Pinot Noir.

Wine of Bordeaux Credit: iStock

Wine of Bordeaux

A wine lover’s list of favorite wines won’t be complete without mentioning Bordeaux wine. Counted among the most famous and also the largest wine regions in France, Bordeaux is the world capital of wine! Situated in Southern France along the sea, the wine produced here tastes unique as it comes mixed with mineral qualities.

Rhone Valley wineCredit: iStock

Rhone Valley wine

Another popular wine region in France is the Rhone Valley in Southeastern France. The region is spread across the meandering Rhone River and the wines produced here are the most expensive one. The Rhone Valley wine is known as Côtes du Rhône wine and some of the prominent products here include Grenache Blanc, Marsanne and Viognier.

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If You’ve Never Explored French Wine Country, Begin With Beaujolais

Each year, more than 10 million visitors journey to France’s storied wine country. Among the most traveled to regions are the big names: Bordeaux, Burgundy, Champagne, Alsace. Conspicuously absent from the top of that list is Beaujolais — an area that might just be more scenically enchanting than all the rest. But just because the masses are missing out doesn’t mean you need to make the same mistake. Here’s why this part of southwestern France is worth exploring today, before it’s ‘discovered’ by everyone else.Accessibility is a word that comes up time and again in describing Beaujolais. Its location is easily reached by car or rail from Lyon, France’s 3rd largest city. Its people are universally welcoming and almost unnervingly hospitable. But most inviting of all is the wine — a light-yet-luscious red fermented exclusively from the gamay grape varietal. Its appeal spans the spectrum of drinkers; from those seeking something delicate, to those in search of boldness; the self-avowed novice to the full-fledged enthusiast.

In the US, our experience with Beaujolais is primarily viewed through the lens of Georges Duboeuf. The 85 year old wine merchant has been exporting juice from the region since 1964. Négociants, as they are known in France, don’t actually make the wine, but partner with the producers to get the liquid bottled, labeled, and brought to market. A testimony to Duboeuf’s profound impact on the region — his lasting partnership with the local farmers — appears in the form of Hameau Dubouef. Built adjacent to the rail station in his hometown of Romaneche-Thorins, this is the only museum in all of France dedicated entirely to winemaking. It’s open daily from 8AM – 7PM and provides the ideal springboard from which to dive headfirst into the heart of Beaujolais. [ . . . ]

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