How to Taste Wine Like a Pro in Three Easy Steps 

Just taking a sip is not the right way to taste wine. Fortunately, learning the process to taste wine doesn’t take too long.

1. Appearance

First, you hold your glass by the stem, not up around the top as you can often see in movies and TV series about wine. Look at everything: the appearance of the wine, which must be brilliant and clear; the color, whose depth, intensity and nuances give information about the grape variety or varieties, and its evolution which indicates the possible age of the wine. For example, for a red wine with an earthy red color, you would call it “brick,” which indicates that you are dealing with a rather old wine. The same goes for a white the color of old gold.

2. Smell

The next step is to bring out the aromas, rotate the glass a little. Professionals do it with their arms in the air, but a neophyte risks spilling and staining their clothes. Let your arms rest on the table and create a circular movement that will “shake” the wine and allow it to release aromas.

Using your nose, you can perceive any defects: the smell of cork or sometimes something musty, toasted. This is probably what is called reduction, as opposed to oxidation. This is a sign that the wine needs air; a decanter should help free it. The aromas must be clear and expressive. They could be primary and reminiscent of fresh fruit, with hints of vanilla, characteristic of barrel aging, or more or less evolved, attesting to a long stay in the cellar.

3. Flavor

Finally, it is in the mouth that you get a definitive idea of the wine by perceiving, through feedback, the heaviest aromas, and by tasting the flavors. The acidity, sweetness and bitterness (which attest to, among other things, the presence of tannins) constitute the body of the wine. What you’re looking for is an attractive harmony, an equilibrium, and above all, the answer to the only question that is worth asking: do I like this wine?

This article was first published on Le Point

Source: How to Taste Wine Like a Pro in Three Easy Steps – Frenchly

France in focus – The other D-Day: 1944 Provence landings

This week, France in Focus heads to the southern port city of Toulon, which is home to the French Navy’s main base. It was here on August 15, 1944, that the Allied invasion of southern France began. We take a closer look at just what happened and explore the various efforts being made today, 75 years later, to ensure the memory of those events lives on.

Source: France in focus – The other D-Day: 1944 Provence landings

France’s Netflix Rival Salto Will Launch in 2020 

All those French shows you wish you could stream could now be available on a new French streaming service, Salto.

Today, French regulators gave the go ahead to three of the country’s major broadcasters to start a joint online video streaming service, Salto, which is expected to launch in early 2020.

France Televisions (a public company) and M6 Groupe and TF1 Groupe (two private companies) are partnering for the venture.

Billed as a French alternative to Netflix, the service will feature French content from a variety of broadcasters and studios as well as some live channels. France Televisions owns France 2, France 3, France 4, France 5 and France Ô, M6 Groupe owns M6, W9, and 6ter, and TF1 Groupe owns TF1, TMC, TFX, TF1 and LCI. To avoid creating a streaming monopoly for the channels, the streaming site’s three broadcasting backers agreed to limit the use of their own content on the site to 40 percent of the offerings available.

In a press release announcing the verdict, Salto stated that the three companies are “combining their forces and proposing an ambitious, local response to the new expectations of the public, all while further reinforcing their active participation in French and European culture.”

Hollywood Reporter noted that’s Salto’s budget would be about $56 million for the first year.

The announcement of the French streaming service came in June 2018, but it only became a reality when regulators gave the go-ahead on August 12. France’s national competition regulator, Autorité de la concurrence, specified in a press release that the trio of broadcasters will have to submit to a series of agreements that will reduce the risk of “coordination” between the broadcasters to acquire the rights to French programs. The three parent companies also won’t be able to cross-promote the platform and their channels.

France isn’t the first country to start its own streaming service. In the U.K., the two largest broadcasters, ITV and the BBC, are launching BritBox, which offers the “best of British” TV and movies. Once given regulatory approval, BritBox will go live, likely this year.

While BritBox is available in North America, it has not yet been announced if Salto will be available Stateside.

Source: France’s Netflix Rival Salto Will Launch in 2020 – Frenchly