Car share operators jump in as Paris Autolib scheme withers 

PARIS (Reuters) – A string of private car-share operators are revving up business in Paris as the pioneering city-run Autolib scheme comes to an end and city authorities promote car sharing over private ownership.

Last month, Paris ended the Bollore Group’s contract to operate its Autolib electric vehicles due to financial difficulties at the state-funded scheme. Its nearly 4,000 cars are set to disappear from Paris roads at the end of July.

“We will reestablish a car sharing offer from September and we will have more cars than we had before with Autolib. Paris will remain a pioneer in shared mobility,” Paris transport chief and deputy mayor Christophe Najdovski told reporters.

At a mobility event where car, scooter and bicycle share operators demonstrated their services in front of city hall, car sharing scheme operators said they planned to expand their operations, but that growth would largely depend on how many dedicated parking spaces the city makes available.

U.S. car-sharing group Zipcar, owned by car rental group Avis, has been active in Paris for five years and plans to grow its fleet from 100 cars today to 150 in September and about 200 by year-end [ . . . ]

Continue at REUTERS: Car share operators jump in as Paris Autolib scheme withers | Reuters

Investing in Fine Wine Is More Lucrative Than Ever – Bloomberg

Once an exotic market, parking your assets inside expensive bottles can yield tremendous profits.

 

Buying rare wines is like investing in a startup: You need 10 years of runway to see significant returns. But unlike a startup, wine is a lot more lucrative these days.

Had you allocated $100,000 to Cult Wines, a U.K.-based wine portfolio manager, your money—which is to say your wine—would have returned an average of 13 percent annually. In 2016, its index performance was actually 26 percent. The fine wine secondary market hovers at about $5 billion, a fraction of the $302 billion global wine market. But Euromonitor International Ltd. projects that while “key luxury players face mounting risks in 2018,” the wine and Champagne category is set to increase by an estimated 7 percent.

To anyone that knows wine, French is the must-have and French Bordeaux the absolute must-have

When it comes to what private bank Coutts & Co. calls the “passion index,” wine is right up there with fancy cars and rare coins [ . . . ]

Continue story at BLOOMBERG: Investing in Fine Wine Is More Lucrative Than Ever – Bloomberg



Read more stories about WINE on Pas De Merde


Rising star Jain is in Quebec

Elle a discuté de la tangente que devrait prendre son deuxième album.

The French sensation Jain was the star of the last conference-interview of the Montreal International Jazz Festival on Friday.

The rising star, which cumulates millions of views on YouTube, has discussed the tangent that should take his second album, Souldier , which will appear on August 24 and his career.

The singer, who offers African, soul, reggae and hip-hop music in Montreal as part of the festival, gave two concerts at the Mtelus.

Source: Rising star Jain is in Quebec



Read more stories about JAIN on Pas De Merde


‘A Bite-Sized History of France’ delightfully combines French history with gastronomy

Napoleon’s most famous (and probably apocryphal) quote weaves together war and food: “An army marches on its stomach.” In a few short words, we are led to consider the immense logistics that make war possible, and the humanity of the people who wage it. It’s a fitting quote to introduce A Bite-Sized History of France, a new and impressive book that intertwines stories of gastronomy, culture, war, and revolution.

Each amuse bouche-sized chapter of “A Bite-Sized History of France” tackles a different theme, ranging from the relationship between the revolutionary government and potatoes to the connection between the thoughts of philosopher Jean-Jacques Rousseau and a search for “authentic” French food. The book delves back to the origins of seemingly eternal fixtures of French food culture (chocolate, raw oysters, sweet pastries) and teases out the meaning of their arrival. And it dives into serious historical events ranging from revolutions to sectarian massacres with real conviction, recapping many of the most significant political and military developments in France’s long history as it goes.

Throughout the book, the authors return to certain themes that tie together its many far-flung topics and tastes. Chief among these are the theme of inequality – an examination of how the rich and the poor pursue pleasure and sustenance is at the heart of “A Bite-Sized History of France” and that frame provides a window into economics, inequality, and revolution. Perhaps mostly strikingly, the authors tell the story of a famous Christmas Day feast for wealthy Parisian during the 1870 siege by Prussian troops. Food had seemingly run out, but for those with means, the zoo would serve as a kind of exotic butcher shop:

“[The meal] began with a stuffed donkey’s head, an inelegant successor to the usual porcine centerpieces of prewar banquets. The soup course included elephant consommé. This was followed by kangaroo stew, rack of bear in pepper sauce, and roasted camel à l’anglaise (a cheeky reference to what the French saw as the plainness of English cuisine.) The main course included le chat flanqué de rats (cat flanked by rats) and cuissot de loup, sauce chevreuil(wolf in deer sauce), a wry inversion of the natural order.” Continue reading “‘A Bite-Sized History of France’ delightfully combines French history with gastronomy”