U.S. Imports Of French Wine And Spirits Soar

After French drinks export shipments to the U.S. dropped significantly in 2020 due to tariffs—whose five-year suspension was announced this past Tuesday—exports have been rebounding strongly in the first four months of 2021. In this calendar year through April, U.S. imports of wine and spirits from France leapt 25% and 13% in volume terms respectively, according to French government agency BusinessFrance. French beer and cider also registered gains during the period.

Provence is now the single-largest region among French wines exported to the U.S. and increased 15% through April in volume terms, driven by ongoing growth for rosé (+17.5%). But the fastest-growing wine region is the Languedoc, which soared 86% year-to-date. Gains were recorded nearly across all segments as vermouth exports to the U.S. rose 41% year-to-date while Champagne surged 48%. Veuve Clicquot and Moët & Chandon together comprise over two-thirds of the Champagne market in the U.S.—according to Impact Databank—and bucked the trend last year by registering volume gains during the pandemic.

With the exception of vodka (-37% year-to-date), imports of French spirits also recorded impressive increases through April. French liqueurs soared 47% in volume terms, while the largest segment, Cognac, rose 49%. After crossing the 5-million-case mark last year, Hennessy Cognac became one of the 10 largest-selling spirits overall in the U.S. market for the first time. Hennessy and Rémy Martin, which is also growing strongly, comprise well over three-quarters of the Cognac market in the U.S., according to Impact Databank.—Juan Banaag

Source: Shanken News Daily: Exclusive news and research on the wine, spirits and beer business

The U.S. may be ready to see cicadas gone, but this French village has a statue, a song and ceramics in their honor

In France, the insects are associated with summer and sun.

By Rick Noack

LE BEAUSSET, France — The five-foot blue iron cicada dangles upside-down from a metal branch, bulging eyes staring at the sky. It appears ready to launch itself at any moment at cars moving through the traffic circle below.

The $34,000 statue was inaugurated last year as a proud defense of the seasonal insect, after complaints from tourists who had dared to ask if the din emanating from the trees could be stopped with an application of insecticide.

The chorus of cicadas, or “cigales,” as they are called here, is an annual and generally beloved phenomenon in southern France, especially in the region of Provence. And the village of Le Beausset, with a population of about 10,000 people and an unknown number of cicadas, is the self-proclaimed cicada capital.

Across the region, visitors can buy cicada postcards and cicada tablecloths and ceramic cicadas in more than three dozen colors. For the biggest fans, shops in Le Beausset’s neighboring town of Le Castellet sell versions that release their deafening sounds whenever anyone comes close.

And so as residents of Le Beausset and across France’s south await the annual chirping of the insects — expected later this month — many here have watched reaction to the U.S. “zombie cicada invasion” with a mix of bewilderment and surprise.

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They understand that the cicada species dominant in southern France emerge in lower density than the 17-year periodical cicadas that have roiled the East Coast this summer. But few here would think of the insect as an edible snack. Or something worthy of 911 noise complaints.

Continue reading “The U.S. may be ready to see cicadas gone, but this French village has a statue, a song and ceramics in their honor”

Comme une Française: Quoi?

You probably already know that the French word “quoi” means “what”… but did you know that it has other meanings, too? Especially in modern spoken French! There are so many ways that you can use this simple French word. In today’s lesson, we’ll explore the different meanings and uses of the word “quoi”. I’ll also introduce you to some popular expressions you can use to sound more authentically French when speaking.
Take care and stay safe. 😘 from Grenoble, France

Géraldine

La talentueuse JEANNE CHERHAL (chanteuse, auteure / compositrice / interprète et pianiste française). Le programme est constitué d’une interview par Coralie Biolay, suivie du concert « féerique » (avec des surprises sonores) de Jeanne, accompagnée de Marc Chouarain au theremin, celesta et Cristal Baschet.

Nouvelle Vague “Guns of Brixton”

The group’s first album, the self-titled Nouvelle Vague, was released in 2004. Explaining how the project came about, leader Oliver Libaux later said: “Marc Collin and I were both musicians and producers in the French music industry when, in 2003, Marc called me with this very strange idea of covering Love Will Tear Us Apart in a bossa nova version. I thought this idea was absolutely crazy but very exciting. So we decided to get into the studio and try it out as soon as possible. Then we did Just Can’t Get Enough and Guns Of Brixton. We put the album together in just eight months.”

What Americans can expect when traveling to France during the pandemic

By Andrew Kunesh

As of today, June 9, 2021, France has reopened to tourists from a handful of nations, including the U.S. Those coming from the U.S. must possess proof of vaccination and a negative COVID-19 test to gain entry to the country without mandatory quarantine.

I’m a huge fan of France and was ecstatic to hear the reopening news. Naturally, I hopped on one of the first flights to Paris (CDG) that arrived just hours after the new regulations went into effect.

Here, I’ll give you a look at my experience entering France under the new coronavirus entry restrictions.

I’ll start with a quick overview of what Americans need to bring for entry to France and then discuss my travel experience, from checking in at New York-JFK to clearing customs at Paris (CDG).

Let’s get started!

Overview of France’s entry requirements (and what to bring)

Vaccinated Americans can now visit France for tourism. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Today, France implemented a “stoplight” system for tourists entering the country. There are three different colors: green, orange and red. Those coming from green countries can enter without restriction if vaccinated, while those in red countries are mostly barred from entry except for essential purposes.

French COVID stoplight system map
(Image courtesy of the French Government)

Orange is the largest category and contains most of the countries outside of the Schengen area. This includes the U.S., U.K., Canada and Mexico, among others.

Entry requirements are very straightforward. According to the French Government (PDF link), vaccinated Americans (and vaccinated travelers from other orange countries) can enter France with the following:

  • Proof of your vaccination — the following vaccines are accepted:
    • AstraZeneca
    • Johnson & Johnson
    • Moderna
    • Pfizer
  • negative COVID-19 test:
    • PCR within 72 hours of boarding
    • Antigen within 48 hours of boarding

Note that you must wait a set amount of time after your COVID-19 vaccine in order to enter France. The wait time depends on which vaccine you received:

  • Two weeks after the second injection for two injection vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca)
  • Four weeks after the injection for single injection vaccines (Johnson & Johnson)

Unvaccinated persons coming from orange countries are not allowed entry to France unless he or she has a “compelling reason” for their visit or is a French citizen, EU national or holds one of a handful of French visas.

Additionally, unvaccinated travelers are subject to tougher restrictions:

  • Proof of a negative COVID test, either:
    • PCR within 72 hours of boarding
    • Antigen within 48 hours of boarding
  • Antigen test on arrival
  • Mandatory seven-day self-quarantine

In other words: if you’re coming from an orange country, you can only visit for tourism if you’re fully vaccinated.

Related: What you need to know about COVID-19 vaccines in the US

COVID-19 restrictions in France

Many COVID-19 restrictions in France have been eased alongside the border reopening. That said, there are still some restrictions in place that you should be aware of if you plan to visit France immediately.

  • There is an 11 p.m. curfew, with a fine for breaking it
  • Indoor dining at cafés and restaurants around the country have resumed indoor dining at 50% capacity, with a maximum of six people allowed per table
  • Outdoor dining has resumed at full capacity
  • Museums are open, albeit with capacity restrictions

Many of these restrictions are set to be lifted at the end of the month. So if you’re a night owl, consider pushing your trip back a few weeks [ . . . ]

Continue at source: What Americans can expect when traveling to France during the pandemic