‘The Eddy’ On Netflix Shows The Gritty Jazzy Reality Of Paris

The first two episodes were directed by ‘La La Land’ director Damien Chazelle.

The new mini-series The Eddy has just been released on Netflix. The first two episodes were directed by La La Land director Damien Chazelle. This is no La La Land. The Eddy is certainly not a romance told through musical dancing numbers. It is a series that aspires to be gritty and true to Parisian living, without falling into the stereotypical postcard image of the city of lights.

The Eddy begins in a jazz club. A handheld camera follows a waiter as the house band performs on stage. The camera swirls from one side to the other, framing each band member in some very strange angles until it turns its attention to the audience, and settles on one man in particular, the main character of the series.

Continue reading “‘The Eddy’ On Netflix Shows The Gritty Jazzy Reality Of Paris”

Watch Naïssam Jalal Collection in concert at the Martinique Jazz Festival 2019

Franco-Syrian flautist Naïssam Jalal thrills the Martinique Jazz Festival to the sound of her powerful compositions. Originally from Syria, the musician has built her musical universe around her many human and artistic encounters. From rap to contemporary jazz, Naïssam Jalal oscillates between different musical cultures. In 2011, the flautist created her quintet Rhythms of Resistance with which she would tour in France and internationally.

Winner of the Victoires du jazz 2019, her unclassifiable album “Quest of the Invisible” turns to trance and silence: the virtuoso takes us on her spiritual quest. After several projects across France, Syria, Japan, Lebanon , Tunisia, Naïssam Jalal marks the 2019 edition of the Martinique Jazz Festival. 

Watch more of the concert at: Jazz Tour Naïssam Jalal Collection in concert at the Martinique Jazz Festival 2019

Camille Bertault scats to Coltane, Parker

John Coltrane
Charlie Parker

Monsieur Pas de Merde is looking forward to Camille Bertault’s visit to Boston this January

Camille became an international sensation when her youtube video of her singing Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” went viral.  Then François Zalacain, head of American label Sunnyside, introduced her to Michael Leonhart and Dan Tepfer. Michael, a trumpeter and multi-instrumentalist would produce her new album while Dan would accompany her on piano. “They’re both French-speaking and interested in the text,” enthuses Camille Bertault, who doesn’t want to make albums where the voice just serves as an instrument. She likes lyrics to hold the limelight.

“Camille Bertault is a force of nature the music world has to reckon with.” – ALL ABOUT JAZZ

“The new voice of Jazz” – VANITY FAIR