What Americans can expect when traveling to France during the pandemic

By Andrew Kunesh

As of today, June 9, 2021, France has reopened to tourists from a handful of nations, including the U.S. Those coming from the U.S. must possess proof of vaccination and a negative COVID-19 test to gain entry to the country without mandatory quarantine.

I’m a huge fan of France and was ecstatic to hear the reopening news. Naturally, I hopped on one of the first flights to Paris (CDG) that arrived just hours after the new regulations went into effect.

Here, I’ll give you a look at my experience entering France under the new coronavirus entry restrictions.

I’ll start with a quick overview of what Americans need to bring for entry to France and then discuss my travel experience, from checking in at New York-JFK to clearing customs at Paris (CDG).

Let’s get started!

Overview of France’s entry requirements (and what to bring)

Vaccinated Americans can now visit France for tourism. (Photo by Clint Henderson/The Points Guy)

Today, France implemented a “stoplight” system for tourists entering the country. There are three different colors: green, orange and red. Those coming from green countries can enter without restriction if vaccinated, while those in red countries are mostly barred from entry except for essential purposes.

French COVID stoplight system map
(Image courtesy of the French Government)

Orange is the largest category and contains most of the countries outside of the Schengen area. This includes the U.S., U.K., Canada and Mexico, among others.

Entry requirements are very straightforward. According to the French Government (PDF link), vaccinated Americans (and vaccinated travelers from other orange countries) can enter France with the following:

  • Proof of your vaccination — the following vaccines are accepted:
    • AstraZeneca
    • Johnson & Johnson
    • Moderna
    • Pfizer
  • negative COVID-19 test:
    • PCR within 72 hours of boarding
    • Antigen within 48 hours of boarding

Note that you must wait a set amount of time after your COVID-19 vaccine in order to enter France. The wait time depends on which vaccine you received:

  • Two weeks after the second injection for two injection vaccines (Pfizer, Moderna, AstraZeneca)
  • Four weeks after the injection for single injection vaccines (Johnson & Johnson)

Unvaccinated persons coming from orange countries are not allowed entry to France unless he or she has a “compelling reason” for their visit or is a French citizen, EU national or holds one of a handful of French visas.

Additionally, unvaccinated travelers are subject to tougher restrictions:

  • Proof of a negative COVID test, either:
    • PCR within 72 hours of boarding
    • Antigen within 48 hours of boarding
  • Antigen test on arrival
  • Mandatory seven-day self-quarantine

In other words: if you’re coming from an orange country, you can only visit for tourism if you’re fully vaccinated.

Related: What you need to know about COVID-19 vaccines in the US

COVID-19 restrictions in France

Many COVID-19 restrictions in France have been eased alongside the border reopening. That said, there are still some restrictions in place that you should be aware of if you plan to visit France immediately.

  • There is an 11 p.m. curfew, with a fine for breaking it
  • Indoor dining at cafés and restaurants around the country have resumed indoor dining at 50% capacity, with a maximum of six people allowed per table
  • Outdoor dining has resumed at full capacity
  • Museums are open, albeit with capacity restrictions

Many of these restrictions are set to be lifted at the end of the month. So if you’re a night owl, consider pushing your trip back a few weeks [ . . . ]

Continue at source: What Americans can expect when traveling to France during the pandemic

Climate update from Brussels

US diplomatic retreat deepens with Covid-19 crisis

The Covid-19 epidemic saw the rapid and almost unprecedented erasure of the United States on the international scene in a matter of months. Dedicated since the election of Donald Trump to a transactional vision of international relations, their institutions paralyzed by a deep political divide, the Americans had revived for a few years with their old isolationist tendencies. This trend suddenly accelerated and accentuated with the coronavirus health crisis. The glaring absence of the United States from all attempts to coordinate a global response to the greatest contemporary pandemic already appears to be a turning point of historic magnitude [ . . . ]

Source: US diplomatic retreat deepens with Covid-19 crisis