My Life in Paris: Montmartre, Movies and Machine Guns, An Essay

In her latest must-read column from Paris, Theadora Brack pays homage to her favorite film, “Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain.”

The sky is electric blue and the air is chilly. Propped up against a rock wall near Brassaï’s 285 steps on rue Foyatier, I watch the carousel spin under the gaze of the Sacré-Cœur. As a nearby street band plays Quizás, Quizás, Quizás over and over, the aroma of Nutella crêpes, salted French fries, and barbe à papa(cotton candy) tickles my nose.

Here in Montmartre’s fabric district, winged scissors graffiti rule the skinny rues. Easily unravelled by the mere sight of spools of yarn, patches, pompoms, and tassels, along with furbelows, bonnets, and bolts of toile de Jouy, this shiny sequinned quarter has never failed to woo my inner do-it-yourselfer.

It’s eleven in the morning. I’m waiting for the doors of Halle Saint-Pierre to open.


Housed in a former 19th-century food market, the museum is similar in spirit to Switzerland’s Collection de l’Art Brut and Baltimore’s American Visionary Art Museum, featuring both contemporary and historic works by self-taught and fringe artists. The current exhibition gives props to movie props, specifically ones created by filmmakers Marc Caro and Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Over the moon, my hands are shaking. See, I’m about to pay homage to my favourite movie: Le Fabuleux Destin d’Amélie Poulain.

I’ve seen the green-filtered confection at least 50 times. If it’s a crime, then I am guilty! But my declaration doesn’t stop there [ . . . ] More at source: My Life in Paris: Montmartre, Movies and Machine Guns, An Essay

A Map of Every Amelie Filming Location in Real Life (in Paris)

Amelie (Le fabuleux destin d’Amélie Poulain in French), directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet, became a French classic with worldwide fame. The romantic comedy shows the history of Amélie Poulain (Audrey Tautou), a waitress in Montmartre who keeps watching the people around her. She aspires to do some good around her and finds a small toy box and decides to find its owner. On her way, she will meet many characters, always with Yann Tiersen music as the original soundtrack, and she will go through many places in Paris you must visit.

If you already know this movie, get ready to follow Amélie Poulain’s steps. If you don’t, watch it before you even read this article, and you shall see a difference in these mythical places.

Read Full Story: A Map of Every Amelie Filming Location in Real Life (in Paris)

Yann Tiersen and More in Moscow this Weekend

Moscow does not believe in tears, but apparently it believes in celebrating Halloween. Moscow Times’ Andrei Muchnik picks his gooviest Halloween events for the weekend, including a concert by Yann Tiersen, composer of the Amelie soundtrack. Da!

If you are short the 2000 rubles for the live Halloween show at Crocus City Hall, give a free listen to Tiersen’s latest from his new album”EUSA”

Halloween is almost here. This weekend almost every bar and club in Moscow will hold its version of a pre-Halloween party, but if you’re not in a mood for trick or treating, there’s plenty of awesome gigs you can go to instead. From one of the most popular British bands in Russia to a great French composer, here are our top picks.

READ FULL STORY at Source: Muchnik’s Picks: Placebo, Yann Tiersen and More Music in Moscow on the Weekend

Chanson Du Jour: La Valse D’ Amelie

Chanson Du Jour 10/20/2016 “La Valse D’ Amelie” by Yann Tiersen

This is one my favorites from the film Amelie. Composer/performer Yann Tiersen plays piano, accordion, violin as well as melodica, xylophone, toy piano, bicycle wheel and a typewriter in one of the greatest film soundtracks ever made. Tiersen won a 2001 BAFTA Award for Best Film Music for Amelie (should have won the Oscar.)