10 Famous Women Artists Who Conquered the World 

Have you ever noticed that most people are not familiar with women artist, even if they can name a lot of male artists? If you are asked to name at least several well-known artists, then you will remember men only: Raphael, Gogh, Dali, and so on. And what about women? Didn’t women succeed in the field of fine arts or perhaps their works have been lost on the pages of centuries-old world history? What was women’s role in art history?

In fact, the women’s share in art really does constitute a smaller number compared to men’s one and therefore only a relatively small number of women managed to become renewed.

Sofonisba Anguissola

She is a famous Italian artist of the second half of the 16th and the beginning of the 17th century, who, first of all, gained her reputation as a portrait master. It is noteworthy that Sofonisbawas born in a noble family, where art classes were held thanks to her father, who dreamed of realizing all the creative abilities of his family consisting of four girls.Sofonisbais known for living portraits of her relatives who she tried to portray in their habitual activities. Among the teachers of the famous artist are Bernardo Campi and Michelangelo himself, although there is no complete certainty about that.

Marie Bashkirtseff

The main merit of this talented artist is that she became among the first Russian female artists whose works were purchased by the Louvre. Marie lived in the middle of the XIX century leading a short but bright and life full of creativity.Marie received all the necessary knowledge concerning painting at the Academy of Painting, however, the girl was constantly engaged in self-education and ask uncle: “Please, type my essay free!”. Soon, she was praised by famous critics in the press becoming more and more popular. To date, original Bashkirtseff’s paintings are a real rarity in the art world, as most of her works were burned down during the Second World War.

Angelica Kauffman

Angelica is considered one of the most educated and talented women during the Enlightenment age. It is known that her father was a middle-handed artist and her family moved not only from city to city, but also to other countries quite a lot.Angelica could paint beautiful things at the age of nine and even then, she was dreaming of becoming a great artist, which, she managed to do. As a result, Angelica was admitted to the Accademia di San Luca, and a few years later, she also joined the ranks of the French Royal Academy. Angelica was the most productive during her stay in London, which lasted 15 years.

Zinaida Serebryakova

Zinaida was born at the end of the nineteenth century in a creative family, in which it was difficult not to become an artist. From the early childhood, the girl was told about the important role of art in the life of every person. At age 25, the artist introduced her own self-portrait to the world, which was highly appreciated by critics at that time.

For a while, Zinaida had to stop painting because she was left alone with four young children. Everyone who knows Serebryakova’s art confirms that it is her paintings that represent the real Russian talent and deserve an art gallery dedicated to her paintings alone.

Marie Tussaud

When it comes to women in art, we are positive that many of you are familiar with the Tussaud name. Surprisingly, but little Marie did not know that her father was a sculptor for a long time, who, in consequence, handed over to her the whole life of his life – the Museum of Wax Figures. Marie continued her father’s business, followed by her children and other descendants.

Camille Claudel

Camille was a persevering and very talented artist who conquered Paris at the age of eighteen. Camilleis known for her resemblance to the popular artist of that time named Rodin with whom, she even had an affair. Nevertheless, such sculptures as “The Wave” and “The Waltz” received mass approval among true connoisseurs of art, and after Camille’s death, they were placed in a separate hall of the Rodin Museum [ . . . ]

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‘Rodin’ Shines As A Story Of Both Artist And Art : NPR

While many biographies of artists focus on their tortured personal lives, Rodin maintains a close focus on sculpture itself and what makes it last.

Deep into Rodin, Jacques Doillon’s quietly satisfying portrait of the famed French sculptor, a group of stuffy sponsors circles Auguste Rodin’s almost completed statue of France’s beloved novelist Honore de Balzac. Rodin (Vincent Lindon) has given the writer an enormous gut (he used a pregnant young woman and a draft horse rider as models for the belly), which the artist made capacious enough to house, in his imagination, the teeming characters who peopled the 19th-century writer’s stories. And, perhaps, his appetites.[ . . . ]

Continue at NPR: ‘Rodin’ Shines As A Story Of Both Artist And Art : NPR

“Rodin” – a film by Jacques Doillon

In Paris, 1880, forty-year-old Auguste Rodin at last receives his first state commission: The Gates of Hell, a sculptural group work composed of many figures, some of which would be the basis of free-standing sculptures that would later bring him fame, such as The Kiss and The Thinker. At the time, he shares his life with Rose, his longtime companion. He meets young Camille Claudel, his most talented student, who quickly becomes his assistant, then his mistress. Ten years of passion, but also of mutual admiration and complicity. After their break-up, Rodin relentlessly pursues his work, coping with the rejection and the enthusiasm provoked by the sensuality of his sculptures, and with his Balzac, rejected during his lifetime, he creates the uncontested departure point of modern sculpture | More at UniFrance

Hidden for a century, a bronze Camille Claudel will be auctioned

An exceptional auction will take place on June 11th at the Chateau d’Artigny in Indre-et-Loire: a sculpture by Camille Claudel, which remained for more than a century hidden in a closet and discovered last April. It is a bronze copy of “La Valse”, a work that caused scandal at the time because of its intense sensuality. There is no doubt that this sculpture will make waltz the auction.[ . . . ]

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