Les petits mots de Romy

Romy Schneider
Romy Schneider

Romy Schneider écrivait. Beaucoup. Notamment sur les tournages. Tous les réalisateurs qui ont travaillé avec elle en témoignent. Certains ont gardé ces précieux trésors.

[ Google Translation ]

By Anne Audigier

An exhibition at the Cinémathèque, a beautiful book which will be released in October… Romy Schneider still inspires just as much. Clémentine Deroudille , the curator of the exhibition and retrospective dedicated to Romy Schneider at the Cinémathèque and Jean-Pierre Lavoignat, who is therefore dedicating a book to her, spoke about the actress in ” Le Grand Atelierphantom” dedicated to her by Vincent Josse.

Among the objects and other souvenirs to be discovered in the exhibition: Romy’s little words. Notes, telegrams, a few lines scribbled on a memo. These little words that she never stopped sending to the directors she worked with. ” It was both spontaneous reactions “, explains Jean-Pierre Lavoignat ” like ‘you didn’t look at me enough during the scene’. Sometimes it was excerpts from books. The son of Claude Sautet, who kept everything, showed me letters from Romy Schneider, where she copied pages from Freud or pages from Goethe to share them because it corresponds to feelings or emotions .

In this mass of documents, an exchange of telegram just before the filming of “César et Rosalie”.

September 1971: Romy Schneider is in Mexico where she is filming ” The Assassination of Trotsky” with Alain Delon. Sautet is working on his next film ” César et Rosalie”. He offered the role of Rosalie to Catherine Deneuve who, enthusiastic at first, let things drag on a bit. Sautet will tell later that he too let things drag on because he wanted Romy.

Jean-Pierre Lavoignat says: ” Sautet sends him a telegram on the set, offering him “César et Rosalie”, and Romy replies :

I know that Madame Deneuve refused it. I’ll be your Rosalie, but I’m not Rosalie.

A telegram in which there are mistakes, Romy Schneider not fully mastering French writes: ” She learned French in a quasi-phonetic way,” recalls Jean-Pierre Lavoignat “therefore in all the letters, even in the last years she writes, there are spelling mistakes that make it even more touching and sincere.”

We can also talk about a service sheet from ” Max et les ferrrailleurs “, where Romy Schneider with a greasy makeup pencil wrote: ” Mon Clo, you will tell the producer and the production manager that I will not come to dinner this evening, since neither the machines nor the electros were invited “.

Tavernier, with whom she shot ” La mort en direct”, said that on the set, she signed all these little words with the name of her character.

Costa-Gavras, who directed Romy Schneider in ” Clair de Femme” , adapted from the novel by Romain Gary, also remembers these little words: ” In the evening, when we parted, she would say little words to me. In the morning, when she arrived, she would say little words to me . One day Costa tells her that they can talk about it, that she doesn’t have to write. Romy’s answer fuses:

You have to write because talking takes flight, it goes away. Writing remains.

” I think she had to say her anxieties,” explains the director, ” anxieties that you can only have when you’re actors and actresses. Really great actors think about every moment. Every moment, there’s You have to get into the character. You have to be the character. Otherwise, the audience doesn’t believe it. “

Source: Les petits mots de Romy

“Brassens, memories too beautiful for me”: the delicate and moving testimony of Agathe Fallet, who was the friend of the poet

By Annie Yanbekian (translated)

Agathe Fallet was the wife of the writer and screenwriter René Fallet, a close friend of Georges Brassens. She thus rubbed shoulders with the poet-singer for a quarter of a century, until his death in October 1981. Forty years later, in a short and superbly illustrated book, she reveals her memories.

Agathe Fallet waited forty years to unveil the treasures buried in her memory. Treasures of humanity from a time gone by, that of his youth alongside her husband René Fallet, writer ( Paris in August, Le Triporteur, La Soupe aux choux …), screenwriter, and above all a great friend by Georges Brassens, which allowed him to work closely with the poet.

The testimony: As the centenary of the birth of Brassens approaches, Agathe Fallet (her real first name is Michelle, Agathe being her nickname) has decided to share her memories, in order to return to her, “before the end of everything” , his “personal tribute”. Because she blames herself, even today, for“all his admiration and all his tenderness”.

However, although it might never have been formulated verbally, there was indeed some tenderness between Georges Brassens and the young wife of his friend René. This tenderness is palpable in the gorgeous photo used for the cover of the book. It is rare that a single illustration can thus summarize a whole work, a whole history of humanities. Georges Brassens, smiling warmly, carries with an incredible benevolence the young woman who is made very small in his arms …

A circle of poets and beautiful souls

The author was not yet seventeen when, in July 1956, she married René Fallet, twelve years her senior. By uniting her destiny with that of the writer, she joined a circle frequented by artists from all walks of life, as illustrated by the splendid photos of her wedding: they are signed by Robert Doisneau, for the most part. The only thing missing was Georges Brassens, already very famous at the time, and who “had delegated Püpchen”, his companion, because ” he was friendly enough not to steal the show from the bride and groom”, believes Agathe Fallet.

Agathe Fallet’s memories are first of all extracts from letters, such as brief chronicles, that René sent her when they were engaged, letters which speak of Brassens. It is then precious moments, but not always exhilarating, Impasse Florimont in Paris, where the young woman spends time with Jeanne, the hostess, and Püpchen, the woman of the life of Brassens, coquettish on her physical appearance. , worried about her age difference with her man (she was ten years older than him). Meanwhile, René Fallet and the poet are upstairs, in “the bedroom-office where Georges worked and enjoyed himself so much” . This piece, Agathe will never see it, “except in photo”. “Unfortunately for being a girl …”,she slips with touching sincerity. It is also an era that lives again in these lines.

Forty years later, an intact wonder

Fortunately, life, dinners with friends, trips to the provinces, tours, allow the young woman to share incredibly privileged moments with Georges Brassens. There are these trips by car where Agathe sometimes takes the wheel of the poet’s DS, at the latter’s request, after overly watered meals … There are improbable conversations, like that day when he said to her without shouting station: “Don’t you think I only hang out with idiots?”

This so personal work gracefully delivers a bunch of little stories, anecdotes, memories, which allow us to sketch portraits in nuances of Georges Brassens and his close entourage. And one always feels, from the first to the last line, this astonishment, this wonder, intact after so many years, to have been there, so close to Brassens. How not to envy Agathe Fallet for having lived all these moments?

The book ends with a small series of photos and personal archives of Agathe Fallet, an article by her husband on Brassens, cards and dedications by the poet … From delicacy and emotion, to final pages.

The cover of Agathe Fallet's book published at the end of October 2021 (ÉDITIONS DES ÉQUATEURS)


“Brassens, memories too beautiful for me”, by Agathe Fallet (Ecuador, 128 pages, 18 €)

Extract: “I listen to Brassens. When it is he who sings. Nobody should allow himself to sing it. His voice has not yet faded, as far as I know. And if that happens, we will read it and we will read it again.
It seems to me that Brassens has become for some a kind of business and that troubles me. I’m probably wrong. We really love Brassens. But Georges is forgotten. He was in the flesh. He was so handsome, incredibly handsome. His voice remains, you must not cover it. ” ( Brassens, memories too beautiful for me, page 17)Source: “Brassens, memories too beautiful for me”: the delicate and moving testimony of Agathe Fallet, who was the friend of the poet

New book on Francis Cabrel’s 40 years of life in songs

He is one of the artists most listened to by the French during the confinement: Francis Cabrel, more than 25 million records sold, is one of the figures of popular song.  

[Google Translation]


“Little Marie”, “I love to die”, “Again and again”, “The Lady of Haute-Savoie” …: for more than forty years, Francis Cabrel has been the author of a singular work and authentic. Embodying a musical genre on its own in French song, his poetry is a popular reference affecting several generations. 

In 13 albums and 25 million copies sold worldwide, the artist quickly became essential thanks to an identity marked by a pronounced accent and his folk guitar.

Francis Cabrel is also an artist concerned with the evolution of society. Thus, he does not hesitate to use his pen to try to raise awareness. His repertoire today contains many universal songs like “La corrida”, “Everyone thinks about it”, “You will have to tell them” or “I loved you, I love you and I will love you”.

Thomas Chaline reveals the secrets of Francis Cabrel’s creation and offers to discover the true story of his songs, which are all landmarks that mark the life of the poet. With the help of numerous anecdotes, the author looks back on around fifty titles and delivers an immersion in the world of one of the biggest record sellers in France. 

[to be published 24/09] Thomas Chaline – Cabrel, a life in songs – Hugo Doc – 9782755649062 – € 16.95

Source: Francis Cabrel, a life in songs: more than 40 years of career

‘The Gourmands’ Way’ review: Six Americans in Paris who changed the way we eat


For Americans growing up in the post-World War II affluence of peace and plenty, convenience cooking, supermarket produce and processed foods formed the basis of [ . . . ]

“The kitchen is a sensual place, and few household activities are more gratifying to the home cook than satisfying the gastronomic whims of a lover or spouse.”

Source: ‘The Gourmands’ Way’ review: Six Americans in Paris who changed the way we eat | Newsday

The Making of a Counterculture Cook 

An excerpt from Alice Waters’s new book, ‘Coming to My Senses’

“When I got back from France, I moved into an old Victorian house on Dwight Way. I felt like the most sophisticated person. I just thought I knew everything. I wanted to live like the French. As luck would have it, a Frenchman, Pierre Furlan, lived downstairs from me in the basement apartment, and he would pop into our lives every so often.

Sometimes when we were experimenting with French recipes, Pierre Furlan would call upstairs, ask what we were having for dinner, come up, and cook. He knew how to cook and would make corrections and additions or give bits of advice if we were going off the rails. At the time, I was making a lot of buckwheat crêpes and watching plenty of Julia Child. She was speaking my language. She was very funny and grounded — she’d drop the chicken on the floor, pick it up, and keep right on going — and I wanted to master the art of French cooking, exactly that. I did buy her book, Mastering the Art of French Cooking, but it was more or less incomprehensible to me; it had no pictures, long and detailed recipes, and lots of writing about precision. It was daunting. But luckily there was the TV show — I loved her manner, and she was a Francophile just like I was. “[ . . . ]

Read More: The Making of a Counterculture Cook – Eater