Joyeux Noël from Notre Dame Cathedral

Sous les auspices de l’Église de Paris représentée par Monseigneur Michel Aupetit, archevêque de Paris la Maîtrise Notre-Dame de Paris donnera un concert de Noël dirigé par Henri Chalet, son directeur, dans la cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris. Ce concert événement, diffusé sur France 2 et KTO se déroulera dans le strict respect des normes sanitaires en cours et réunira 20 chanteurs du choeur d’adultes de la Maîtrise, accompagnés par Yves Castagnet à l’orgue positif (instrument loué pour l’occasion), ainsi que par 2 solistes: Julie Fuchs (soprano) et Gautier Capuçon (violoncelle).

Why Oh Why Do I Love Paris?

When the pandemic lifts, all good Americans will want to go back to Paris.

As Cole Porter’s song says, “I love Paris in the springtime. I love Paris in the fall. I love Paris in the winter when it drizzles. I love Paris in the summer when it sizzles.” I suspect most people do. And with the prospect next year of being able to visit again this glorious city, which Ernest Hemingway famously called, “a moveable feast,” I am already thinking about all I want to see and all I want eat.

I’ve been visiting Paris since I was in college, though I never lived there for an extended period of time, so that I have been able to pull back from its charms and discover them anew whenever I go back. The obvious appeal of the best-known tourists sites—the Arc de Triomphe, the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre, Versailles, Notre Dame—can be seen in mere days, but the city’s beauty, breadth and depth are what Thomas Jefferson said about the city: “A walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of life.” Continue reading “Why Oh Why Do I Love Paris?”

‘Notre-Dame: Our Lady of Paris’ ABC documentary revisits bravery, first-hand accounts of 2019 fire

The infamous Notre-Dame cathedral fire of 2019 shocked the world. Now, in a two-hour documentary special, ABC will revisit first-hand accounts of the disaster in “Notre-Dame: Our Lady of Paris.”

Together with harrowing footage from within the inferno, “Notre-Dame: Our Lady of Paris” features interviews with firefighters, clergy, local officials, and those who were inside the cathedral on April 15, 2019, to tell the story of the fire watched around the world.

The Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Paris is one of the most visited tourist destinations in the world, and is also the keeper of some of Christianity’s most priceless and revered relics.

The fire was broadcast live throughout the world. People looked on helplessly as 500 Parisian firefighters were losing the battle against a raging fire that was destroying it all.

The world cried and prayed, powerless as the flames threatened to wipe out nearly 900 years of history.

Ultimately, the president of France and the general in charge of the Paris Fire Brigade made the significant decision of sending a commando of elite firefighters to an extremely perilous, even suicidal mission to save the cathedral.

“Notre-Dame: Our Lady of Paris” highlights the events of that fateful night, and highlights the brave and extraordinary efforts to save the very soul of Paris and Europe’s most precious monument.

Don’t miss “Notre-Dame: Our Lady of Paris” on Wednesday, September 16 at 9 p.m. on ABC.Source: ‘Notre-Dame: Our Lady of Paris’ ABC documentary revisits bravery, first-hand accounts of 2019 fire – ABC11 Raleigh-Durham

Paris prepares for its first Christmas outside Notre Dame

Notre Dame
Notre Dame

The cathedral’s famed celebrations will take place at Saint-Germain l’Auxerrois as its congregants and choir carry their faith “beyond the walls.”

Notre Dame kept Christmas going even during two world wars – a beacon of hope amid the bloodshed.

Yet an accidental fire in peacetime finally stopped the Paris cathedral from celebrating Midnight Mass this year, for the first time in over two centuries.

As the lights stay dim in the once-invincible 855-year-old landmark, officials are trying hard to focus on the immediate task of keeping burned out Notre Dame’s spirit alive in exile through service, song, and prayer.

“This is the first time since the French Revolution that there will be no midnight Mass [at Notre Dame],” cathedral rector Patrick Chauvet told The Associated Press.

There was even a Christmas service amid the carnage of World War I, Mr. Chauvet noted, “because the canons were there and the canons had to celebrate somewhere,” referring to the cathedral’s clergy. During World War II, when Paris was under Nazi occupation, “there was no problem.” He said that to his knowledge, it was only closed for Christmas in the period after 1789, when the anti-Catholic French revolutionaries turned the monument into “a temple of reason.”

Christmas-in-exile at Saint-Germain l’Auxerrois this year will be a history-making moment.

“We have the opportunity to celebrate the Mass outside the walls, so to speak … but with some indicators that Notre Dame is connected to us,” Mr. Chauvet said.

Those indicators include a wooden liturgical platform that has been constructed in the Saint-Germain church to resemble Notre Dame’s own. A service will be led at midnight on Dec. 24 by Mr. Chauvet to a crowd of faithful, including many who would normally worship in the cathedral, accompanied by song from some of Notre Dame’s now-itinerant choir.

The cathedral’s iconic Gothic sculpture “The Virgin of Paris,” from which some say Notre Dame owes its name, is also on display in the new annex.

The 14th-century masterpiece, which measures around six feet and depicts Mary and baby Jesus, has come to embody the officials’ message of hope following the fire.

Continue reading “Paris prepares for its first Christmas outside Notre Dame”