Video: Paris tightrope walker wows onlookers with ‘magic’ Montmartre spectacle

French tightrope artist left hundreds of Parisians and tourists stunned with a performance that featured a walk on a rope suspended 35 meters (115 feet) above the ground in the city’s famous district of Montmartre.

Tatiana-Mosio Bongonga walked on a rope suspended by a crane at the base of the hill’s steps toward the Sacre Coeur basilica accompanied by a chamber orchestra, without any security equipment, a gesture many in the audience found nerve-wracking.

“It’s very surprising and very dangerous. It really impressed me, actually. I noticed that she was not secured. There was a lot of acrobatics. I had a really good time,” spectator Jennifer Mandelbaum told Reuters.

Bongonga, who prepared for the show for a year, said the experience of walking on a rope over Montmartre was “magic”.

Her performance was the first time a tightrope walker had attempted to cross up to the Sacre Coeur [ . . . ]

Continue reading at THE LOCAL: Video: Paris tightrope walker wows onlookers with ‘magic’ Montmartre spectacle – The Local



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Naked attraction: art and tragic tales in Modigliani’s Paris

As Tate Modern prepares a new exhibition of his work, including 12 of his famous nudes, Louise Roddon explores the artist’s haunts around Montmartre and Montparnasse

Poor Amedeo Modigliani, what a tough life he led. I’m thinking this as I climb the steps to his last studio in Montparnasse. It’s a classic artist’s garret with peeling paint and poor lighting, and climbing the countless floors on a narrow stone tread, leaves me winded. It wouldn’t have been easy for a man with advanced tuberculosis. With Tate Modern about to stage its Modigliani exhibition, I’ve come to number 8 Rue de la Grande-Chaumière, his final home before he died tragically young in 1920. At 35, he wasn’t just a victim of TB, but was suffering the toll of a lifetime’s enthusiasm for alcohol and drugs [ . . . ]

More: Naked attraction: art and tragic tales in Modigliani’s Paris

The Stubborn Genius of Auguste Rodin

The hundredth anniversary of the death of Auguste Rodin prompts “Rodin at the Met,” a show of the Metropolitan Museum’s considerable holdings in works by the artist. But no occasion is really needed. Rodin is always with us, the greatest sculptor of the nearly four centuries since Gian Lorenzo Bernini perfected and exalted the Baroque. Matter made flesh and returned to matter, with clay cast in bronze: Rodin. (There are carvings in the show, too, but made by assistants whom he directed. He couldn’t feel stone.) You know he’s great even when you’re not in a mood for him [ . . . ]

Read Full Story: The Stubborn Genius of Auguste Rodin | The New Yorker